Stripes

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I think I have come to a shocking revelation; I’m not a huge Bill Murray fan. Sure I like him, and I enjoy plenty of the movies he has been in – particularly in the early days, but he’s rarely laugh out loud funny for me. Stripes is another good Billy Murray movie where he is supported by an terrific comedy cast – it is those guys who evoke the most laughter from me and I always get that gnawing suspicion that this film, and even a few other Murray classic might have been better with someone else in his place. Blasphemy, I know! I’ve no idea who that other person may be but still, that suspicion rears its head, chomping away at me and saying everyone else is laughing, why aren’t you laughing you weirdo? Stripes is one late 70s, early 80s cult comedy classic that had always somehow passed me by – while plenty of the films made around the same time by the same cast, writers, directors are ones I grew up with, Stripes is a film I only came to in recent years.

Murray plays a deadbeat taxi driver who loses his job, girlfriend, and apartment after a particularly bad day – in classic Murray fashion this all drifts off his back in a carefree way. Looking for something to pass the time rather than any higher notion, he encourages his friend (Harold Ramis) to join the army with him. As this is the 80s, they set off and hi-jinks ensue. We meet a variety of cadets and commanders, as portrayed by some of Hollywood’s finest and a fair few up and coming comedy stars – Warren Oates, PJ Soles, Judge Reinhold, and John Candy are some of the recognizable faces. Like any other number of movies of similar ilk, we get training skits showing how Ramis and Murray rub against authority but eventually, and nonsensically, they complete training and are sent on a top secret mission.

To the film’s credit, it resolves the conflict between maintaining a semblance of plot while the slacker skits are played out – the comedians are given free-rein, but only as much as the plot will allow. The plot is by the by, but it’s enough to keep us engaged whereas a series of unrelated bits would have just fallen flat. The comedy mixes slapstick with deadpan slacker humour, light satire, visual gags, and mini stand-up routines. It doesn’t go the juvenile way of Police Academy though there are moments of raunch and sex comedy, and the general tone is one of playful anarchy. If it was one I grew up with, like the aforementioned cop series, or some of John Candy’s hits, then I’m sure I would hold more fondness for this, but watching as a new customer it gets a few laughs, chuckles, and holds the attention, but not much more than that.

Is Stripes one of your favourite comedy’s? How do you think it ranks alongside other comedies of the time and subsequent slacker type movies? Let us know in the comments!

Race With The Devil

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It’s Peter Fonda, Warren Oates, motorbikes, and devil worshippers – what more could you possibly want? Yes, it’s another one of those American attempts at a Hammer movie and although it isn’t going to win any awards or top any lists it’s still plenty of fun.

The two couples in this movie are not quite yuppies but they definitely symbolize the ‘city’ in the good old fashioned city vs country trope which appears all the time in horror movies. Oates and Fonda are (not brothers, I could have sworn they were) owners of a Motorcycle shop and have just splashed out on what classed as a fancy RV in the 70s. Rather than hop down to Florida for a few weeks on a beach, they load their motorbikes onto the back of the RV, load their wives inside (and an annoying dog) and hit the road for a spot of camping and dirt riding (of the motorcycle and sexual variety). After pulling over in a random field they stick on the Barbie, make some cocktails, and enjoy staring up at the stars and shooting the shit. As the little ladies get ready for bed, Oates and Fonda stumble upon some hippy ritual with masked weirdos and exposed titties. But wait, this ain’t just any old ritual, it’s a good old fashioned sacrifice! And now they’ve been spotted – run!

You can gauge the paths the film is going to tread from fairly early on – the vague, non-committal answers from the local townsfolk, the suspicious glances, and investigations into demons and witchcraft. As with all these films there is deception and chasing, but this one offers less horror and more action than you would expect. In many ways this feels like a halloween episode of CHiPs or Knight Rider than an actual horror film, but that’s no bad thing from where I’m sitting. The endless Zulu-like parade of bad guys makes you think that half the State is populated by evil devil worshippers and the way they just keep coming after the four campers is quite funny – the public chases and massive amounts of damage are sure to draw a hell of a lot more attention to their antics than if they had just let the witnesses get away and rant to some cops in the big city who wouldn’t be arsed to investigate.

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Like I said, this ain’t gonna light anyone’s fire too brightly, but it makes for an entertaining evening for fans of the genre or the stars while remaining an interesting relic of days gone by. Let us know in the comments what you thought of the movie.