Best Music (Scoring) – 1968

Official Nominations: The Lion In Winter. Planet Of The Apes. The Thomas Crown Affair. The Shoes Of The Fisherman. The Fox. Oliver! Star! Finian’s Rainbow. The Young Girls Of Rochefort. Funny Girl.

The Scoring award was split this year between original and adaptation scores, but I’ll bundle them into one. John Barry picked up an official win for The Lion In Winter, a score with many heavy and mysterious tones thanks to dramatic horns and ominous low blasts, made all the more eerie thanks to the choir. Goldsmith’s soundtrack to The Planet Of The Apes is a fitting mixture of the experimental and strange with creeping piano and woodwind instruments. The main theme lacks a true hook, giving that air of mystery, threat, and confusion that the film relies on. Legrand’s work for The Thomas Crown Affair is filled with jazz and cool, but as such lacks the melodies which tend to grab me and mostly reminds me of musical wafted through shopping malls. Alex North does find some useful melodies in the stirring score for The Shoes Of The Fisherman but nothing outstanding while Schifrin’s work for The Fox has some truly beautiful moments throughout the main arrangements. Johnny Green picked up another win for Oscar – you already know how it sounds, while you can imagine exactly how Lennie Hayton’s Star! sounds. Similarly, Heindorf and Burton’s Finian’s Rainbow is mostly fluff while Legrand does the French equivalent with The Young Girls Of Rochefort. Oh look! Funny Girl is your standard musical fare.

My Winner: The Lion In Winter.

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My Nominations: The Lion In Winter. The Planet Of The Apes. The Fox. 2001: A Space Odyssey. Barbarella. Bullitt. Hang Em High. The Odd Couple. Once Upon A Time In The West. Rosemary’s Baby. Where Eagles Dare.

I add a number of obvious choices in this category – films either with classic themes, haunting scores, or a combination of both. Ennio Morricone does it again, and maybe pulls off his finest score for Once Upon A Time In The West while Stanley Kubrick (yes yes I’m cheating) borrows a number of famous classical works and applies them to the vastness of space and time meaning no viewer of 2001 can watch a clip of the movie without thinking of the music and no listener can hear the music without thinking of the movie. Maurice Jarre gets yet another nomination merging sexy cool with mystery while Lalo Schifrin continues his trend for yearly nominations with an equally cool, mysterious, and jazzy score for Bullitt. Neal Hefti earns a nomination for crafting an ever popular theme in The Odd Couple while Krysztof Komeda makes a generation creeped out by lullabies forever thanks to his work on Rosemary’s Baby. Ron Goodwin gets a nomination for his suitably militaristic and heroic music on Where Eagles Dare, rousing and ominous at once and lastly, Dominic Frontiere gets a vote for his great pieces in Hang Em High – they may borrow heavily from Morricone, but in the best possible way.

My Winner: Once Upon A Time In The West.

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Which movie of 1968 do you think has the Best Scoring? Let us know in the comments!

Best Costume Design: 1968

Official Nominations: Romeo And Juliet. Star! Oliver! The Lion In Winter. Planet Of The Apes

No surprises this year, as is standard for this category, with musicals and historic and costume dramas leading the year. Perhaps Morton Haack’s work on Planet Of The Apes is a surprise given the type of film, but it is a deserving nomination. Two time winner Danilo Donati’s Romeo And Juliet is the ‘weak link’ here, while Star! is a little too generic in its extravagance. Oliver! is a good choice for winner, the costumes as important as the music, setting, and performances. My pick though is for  The Lion In Winter with Margaret Furse and Lee Poll – it’s all very brown and drab and selected to make England look barren and frigid, but with a flawless eye for detail.

My Winner: The Lion In Winter

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My Nominations: 2001: A Space Odyssey. Barbarella. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Once Upon A Time In The West. The Lion In Winter. Planet Of The Apes.

Only two make it over to my list, joining Once Upon A Time In The West – another movie highlighting the skill of Carlo Simi. My other selections are more iconic, with 2001: A Space Odyssey making sure that wardrobe was as integral a piece of the puzzle as the effects, and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang throwing as much colour and razzle dazzle at the screen as possible. My controversial winner though has to be the most iconic of the bunch, with Jacques Fonteray and Paco Rabanne’s Barbarella sexing up the decade like no other movie.

My Winner: Barbarella

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Which movie of 1968 do you think deserves the 1968 Best Costume Oscar? Let us know in the comments!