Best Writing (Original) – 1967

Official Nominations: William Rose (Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner), David Newman, Robert Benton (Bonnie And Clyde), Robert Kaufman, Norman Lear (Divorce, America Style), Jorge Semprun (The War Is Over), Frederic Raphael (Two For The Road).

William Rose was the official winner this year, his screenplay for Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner showing a lighter comedic touch than his previous offerings. Altogether less subtle and light is Kaufman and Lear’s Divorce American Style which offers strong satire but feels dated now. Jorge Semprum’s nomination seems like an unusual choice – decent script but a film which few will recall now, and Raphael’s work on Two For The Road is a bold choice but deserved giving the ingenuity of the storytelling on offer. My winner though goes to Newman and Benton’s riproaring Bonnie And Clyde, one of the finest examples of twisting the truth to tell a new tale.

My Winner: Bonnie And Clyde.

Bonnie & Clyde Dunaway Beatty Pollard

My Nominations: Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner. Bonnie And Clyde. Two For The Road. The Fearless Vampire Killers. The Firemen’s Ball. Le Samourai. The Shooting.

I have added a selection of four movies to my personal nominations, a mixture of satire, farce, crime, and existential drama, with my winning vote going to Polanski and Gerard Brach’s The Fearless Vampire Killers.

My Winner: The Fearless Vampire Killers

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Which movie of 1967 do you think has the Best Original Screenplay? Let us know in the comments!

Best Cinematography: 1967

Official Nominations: Bonnie And Clyde. Camelot. Doctor Dolittle. In Cold Blood. The Graduate.

An unsurprising mix of movies make the cut this year, with Bonnie And Clyde picking up the official win, Burnett Guffey ensuring that his experience of shooting noir films gave a certain edge to the proceedings. Both Camelot and Doctor Doolittle look stunning but are let down in other areas by being too generic. The shooting of authentic locales with black and white photography gives In Cold Blood a unique look while The Graduate manages to capture a moment in time which remains both timeless and fixed.

My Winner: Bonnie And Clyde.

Bonnie-and-Clyde-624

My Nominations: Bonnie And Clyde. Doctor Dolittle. In Cold Blood. The Graduate. One Million Years BC. Le Samourai. The Fearless Vampire Killers. The Shooting.

I’ve added a few unlikely but worthy picks for my personal nominations, with perhaps the most obvious being One Million Years B.C – a film known for iconic visual moments rather than plot, acting, or direction. The Mediterranean beaches are transformed into realistically threatening pre-historic vistas and as a child watching we never doubt that what we’re seeing isn’t real. The rarely seen The Shooting has a stylized vision which few Westerns have emulated while Le Samourai went on to be highly influential. Finally, The Fearless Vampire Killers is a bizarre mixture of surreal dreamlike imagery and Hammer style atmospheric shots.

My Winner: The Fearless Vampire Killers.

Moon, Sleigh & Snow - The Fearless Vampire Hunters (1967)

Which film of 1967 do you feel has the Best Cinematography? Let us know in the comments!