Nightman’s Favourite Films Of The 2000s – Stats Roundup

Greetings, Glancers! So, older readers of my Oscars posts may recall that I tried to give some stats at the end of the year. It became too difficult to gather metrics and I become too lazy, and lo the posts migrated to the Hades Of Blogs like so many before. The same will likely happen to these summary posts – where I give some ‘interesting’ stats on my favourite films of each decade. It doesn’t mean anything, you won’t gain any insight or pleasure from reading them, and they will be painful to write. Why do it? Well shucks, I’ve always had a thing for hurting myself. ‘Enjoy’!

Note – I wrote this before realizing I’d missed Pan’s Labyrinth, and I’m too lazy to update the figures now. Yay!

Number Of Best Picture Nominees: (Out of a possible fifty) Six

Number Of Best Picture Winners:  (Out of a possible ten) Three

Number Of Movies In The Top Ten Grossing of The Year: (Out of a possible one hundred) Eleven

Number Of Movies Which Were The Top Grosser: (Out of a possible ten) Two

The number of films nominated for Best Picture this year, and the number or Top Grossing films, are way down this year. If anything, the Noughties was the decade I just stopped caring what The Academy was picking (and my interest in the first place was fairly low anyway) and by the end of the decade I wasn’t really going to the Cinema on a regular basis anymore. The number of sequels and of comic book and animated movies earning big bucks increased, while on the flip side I started to watch and enjoy less of those movies. The Academy was playing it too safe, picking your standard dramas, one off hits, or gimmick films and avoiding actual quality, daring, film-making. Making the Academy numbers look marginally worse is the fact that in 2009 they finally increased the numbers of nominees from five to ten – that year I still only picked one of the nominees. I assume this trend will continue into the next decade, though the number of films I’ve seen from 2010 onwards is much lower. This will likely be the last Stats post I do until I get caught up with more movies from 2010 onwards.

Movies By Country In My Top 10:

USA: Fifty Eight

UK: Fifteen

Japan: Eleven

France: Thirteen

Germany: Eight

Poland: Two

Brazil: One

Italy: Three

New Zealand: Two

Hungary: One

Spain: Two

China: Three

Hong Kong: Five

Singapore: One

South Korea: Seven

Mexico: One

Czech Republic: One

Taiwan: One

Denmark: Two

Liberia: One

Sweden: Two

Canada: Three

Thailand: One

Norway: One

Australia: One

The USA dominates again although the numbers are drastically decreased from previous decades.

Movies By Director:

Quentin Tarantino: xxxxx

 

Jean Pierre Jeunet: xxx

Chan Wook Park: xxx

 

Takashi Shimizu: xx

Zhang Yimou: xx

Peter Jackson: xx

Robert Rodriguez: xx

Frank Darabont: xx

Christopher Nolan: xx

Sam Raimi: xx

Takashi Miike: xx

Christopher Guest: xx

Lars Von Trier: xx

Kim Jee Woon: xx

 

Shusuke Kaneko: x

Disney: x

David Lynch: x

Luc Besson: x

Zach Snyder: x

David Slade: x

Oren Peli: x

Juan Carlos Fresnadillo: x

Kong Su Chang: x

Martin Scorsese: x

Christopher Smith: x

Kevin Lima: x

Jaume Balaguero: x

Paco Plaza: x

Pierre Morel: x

John hoo Bong: x

Jean-Stephane Sauvaire: x

Bruce McDonald: x

Matt Reeves: x

Sylvester Stallone: x

Wilson Yip: x

Tomas Alfredson: x

Yojiro Takita: x

Pascal Laugier: x

Sion Sono: x

Tommy Wirkola: x

Satoshi Kon: x

Frank Miller: x

George Lucas: x

Judd Apatow: x

Mike Judge: x

Edgar Wright: x

Stephen Sommers: x

Bill Paxton: x

Larry Clark: x

Alfonso Cuaron: x

Alexandre Aja: x

Roman Polanski: x

James Wan: x

The Pang Brothers: x

Jaume Collet Serra: x

Andrew Lau: x

Alan Mak: x

George A Romero: x

Hideo Nakata: x

Fernando Meirelles: x

Bernardo Bertolucci: x

Len Wiseman: x

Mel Gibson: x

Kurt Wimmer: x

Yoji Yamada: x

Danny Boyle: x

Eli Roth: x

Shane Black: x

Ridley Scott: x

Tim Burton: x

Cameron Crowe: x

Karyn Kusama: x

Michael Dougherty: x

Gore Verbinski: x

Larry Charles: x

Martin Campbell: x

Craig Brewer: x

Neil Marshall: x

Takeshi Kitano: x

Brad Anderson: x

Kinji Fukasaku: x

James Wong: x

Ang Lee: x

Bryan Singer: x

David Twohy: x

M Night Shyamalan: x

One hundred films, 86 directors. Tarantino is the clear front runner, which surprises me more than you. I’m by no means a Tarantino super-fan and Reservoir Dogs is still my favourite of his, but it looks like this was a great decade for him. Disney had a bit of a shocker – the mainstay of my lists each decade only grabbing a single vote here. Elsewhere it’s foreign films which garner the most multiple votes with my only two triple votes being outside of the US and six or seven of my double votes being beyond Hollywood. Those getting single votes range from newbs and a wide array of past masters who have received multiple votes over multiple decades.

As always, check out my individual year posts and let me know what your favourites are in the comments!

Nightman’s Favourite Films Of The 1980s – Stats Roundup

Greetings, Glancers! So, older readers of my Oscars posts may recall that I tried to give some stats at the end of the year. It became too difficult to gather metrics and I become too lazy, and lo the posts migrated to the Hades Of Blogs like so many before. The same will likely happen to these summary posts – where I give some ‘interesting’ stats on my favourite films of each decade. It doesn’t mean anything, you won’t gain any insight or pleasure from reading them, and they will be painful to write. Why do it? Well shucks, I’ve always had a thing for hurting myself. ‘Enjoy’!

Number Of Best Picture Nominees: Five (Out of a possible fifty)

Number Of Best Picture Winners: One (Out of a possible ten)

Number Of Movies In The Top Ten Grossing of The Year: Twenty nine (Out of a possible one hundred)

Number Of Movies Which Were The Top Grosser: Five (Out of a possible ten)

Well… this was the decade when The Academy began making truly bizarre choices when it came to Best Picture. When it came to most of the big categories actually, and it’s something they haven’t ever really recovered from. I’m not saying that just because this was the decade I grew up in and therefore have a lot of childhood association to the films I’ve picked as favourites – I do feel that many of the films in my Top Tens were far more deserving of critical attention, and in many cases that acclaim has come in the years and decades since.

This was certainly a decade when cinema as pure entertainment was perfected – we have more classics per genre than any other decade, and directors and writers must have been allowed a degree of freedom and creativity never seen before or since which led to many wacky ideas and films which you couldn’t believe would have ever seen the light of day at any other time. Naturally this meant we got an unprecedented level of crap too, and even some of those are beloved by me, but by and large it’s the decade when my favourite filmmakers and stars hit their peak. You may be wondering then why I only picked 29 out of the top 100 grossing films – well, we had a high rate of romances and comedies too which, while I like many of them, weren’t strong enough for me to put on my lists. While, as you’ll see below, there weren’t many foreign films causing my grossing figures to be low, there were a lot of cult hits and sequels that I love which didn’t make as much money as the originals.

Movies By Country In My Top 10:

USA: Ninety one

UK: Sixteen

Italy: One

Japan: Three

France: One

Australia: One

Canada: Two

HK: Five

The USA dominates again, to a ridiculous degree. While a lot of that is due to me mainly being exposed to Hollywood movies in my childhood, I still watched plenty of foreign stuff too. While those were mainly martial arts movies, few of those were strong enough to make my lists. The UK is really only here for Bond now but had plenty of crossover hits, Japan had still mostly fallen away even though there were plenty of Japanese animated movies I liked they were again rarely strong enough to penetrate the top ten.

Movies By Director:

John Carpenter: Seven

John Glen: Four

David Cronenberg: Four

 

Steven Spielberg: Two

John Landis: Two

David Lynch: Two

James Cameron: Two

Sam Raimi: Two

Francis Ford Coppola: Two

Stanley Kubrick: Two

Brian De Palma: Two

Jerry Paris: Two

Walter Hill: Two

George A Romero: Two

Richard Donner: Two

Robert Zemeckis: Two

John McTiernan: Two

Tim Burton: Two

John Woo: Two

John Hughes: Two

Sylvester Stallone: Two

Oliver Stone: Two

Rob Reiner: Two

Ivan Reitman: Two

 

John G Avildson: x

Tobe Hooper: x

Akira Kurosawa: x

Walter Murch: x

Robert Harmon: x

Martin Scorsese: x

Joe Dante: x

Ridley Scott: x

Tony Scott: x

George Miller: x

Russell Mulcahy: x

John Milius: x

Ted Kotcheff: x

Barry Levinson: x

George P Cosmatos: x

Alan Parker: x

Martin Brest: x

Gerald Scarfe: x

Cliver Barker: x

Paul Michael Glaser: x

Joel Schumacher: x

Paul Verhoeven: x

Chuck Russell: x

Jim Drake: x

Kathryn Bigelow: x

Larry Cohen: x

Irvin Kershner: x

John Hough: x

Mark L Lester: x

Ching Siu-Tung: x

Bruce Robinson: x

Ringo Lam: x

Vincent McEveety: x

Hayao Miyazaki: x

Arthur Hiller: x

Ruggero Deodato: x

Desmond Davis: x

Sidney J Furie: x

Wes Craven: x

John Huston: x

Mary Lambert: x

Stephen Herek: x

Ron Howard: x

Michael Lehmann: x

Christopher Cain: x

Katsushiro Otomo: x

Newt Arnold: x

Tony Randel: x

Richard Marquand: x

John Badham: x

Luc Besson: x

Jackie Chan: x

Sammo Hung: x

Hugh Wilson: x

One hundred films, seventy eight directors. When people think of the 80s, they usually say it was Spielberg’s decade, or belonged to John Hughes. I was never a massive fan of the more mainstream John Hughes films and while Spielberg was everywhere in the 80s, people may forget that he didn’t always direct many of the films he was associated with. For me, the decade belonged to John Carpenter. Ten years, seven top ten movies – that’s pretty unprecedented. Then again, I am biased as Carpenter is my favourite director of all time. The numbers don’t lie though, and he’s way out on top. While we have a large list of directors with only one hit on my lists, a number of those single hits happened to me my first or second film of the year, and we have plenty of stalwarts with a deuce. Only coming close to Carpenter are John Glen, who directed every Bond film of the 80s, and David Cronenberg with his terrific run of classics.

Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

Nightman’s Favourite Films Of The 1970s – Stats Roundup

Greetings, Glancers! So, older readers of my Oscars posts may recall that I tried to give some stats at the end of the year. It became too difficult to gather metrics and I become too lazy, and lo the posts migrated to the Hades Of Blogs like so many before. The same will likely happen to these summary posts – where I give some ‘interesting’ stats on my favourite films of each decade. It doesn’t mean anything, you won’t gain any insight or pleasure from reading them, and they will be painful to write. Why do it? Well shucks, I’ve always had a thing for hurting myself. ‘Enjoy’!

Number Of Best Picture Nominees: Twenty three (Out of a possible fifty)

Number Of Best Picture Winners: 7 (Out of a possible ten)

Number Of Movies In The Top Ten Grossing of The Year: Thirty three (Out of a possible one hundred)

Number Of Movies Which Were The Top Grosser: Five (Out of a possible ten)

The number of films nominated for Best Picture this year is unsurprisingly high. In this decade The Academy and myself largely saw eye to eye thanks to a new wave of American directors whose films gained critical attention and personal adoration. Special mention goes to 1975, which may be the only year where all five films nominated for Best Picture appear in my personal Top Ten, as well as three of the Top Ten Grossing movies. Not only that, 1976 followed with 4 of the nominees making my list, as well as being one of the few years to have a clean sweep by country – all ten movies in my list are from the US. 1978 actually also has 10 US movies, though Superman is classed as being US/UK/Switzerland/Panama. By and large The Academy got it right this year, with seven Best Picture winners making it to my top ten lists – I don’t think we’ll get such a high number again and I anticipate the 80s being much lower. Twenty three out of the fifty total nominees made my list, that’s up from the 60s and the 50s.

In terms of top grossing movies, five of the top grossers made my lists, which is up from the 60s but down from the 50s – I put that down to the 60s having many successful costume epics and musicals, not my favourite genres, and me being more familiar with 70s movies and enjoying movies further outside the mainstream than what the 50s had to offer. Just to confuse things though, the thirty three films in the Top Ten grossing movies by year is higher than the 50s, but lower than the sixties…. so I’m not sure what to make of the stats. I will say 33 out of 100 is lower than what I expected but that I anticipate the 80s to be much higher.

Movies By Country In My Top 10:

USA: Seventy three

UK: Nineteen

Italy: Seven

Japan: One

France: Three

Germany: One

Australia: Four

Hong Kong: Five

Thailand: One

Canada: Two

Netherlands: One

Switzerland: One

Panama: One

The USA dominates again with a whopping seventy three films out of 100, one less than the 1950s. I was expecting this decade to be high as it is really when most of my favourite US directors and performers were hitting their peaks. Aside from the US, we have a few notable changes, namely Japan falling from grace and Spain disappearing completely. Japan had ten entries in the 50s, five in the 60s, but only one in the 70s. Don’t worry, that will pick up again. The UK drops down to nineteen, an expected drop after the swinging sixties, while Italy dropped a little to seven – held up by a new wave of horror movies. France stays consistent with single figures, Canada returns with a couple, but the newbies on the list are Australia with four and Hong Kong with five – Bruce Lee on the latter and a few up and comers for the former.

Movies By Director:

Robert Altman: Four

Dario Argento: Three

Walter Hill: Three

Francis Ford Coppola: Three

William Freidkin: Three

Sidney Lumet: Three

 

Bruce Lee: Two

Mel Brooks: Two

Guy Hamilton: Two

Sam Peckinpah: Two

Nicholas Roeg: Two

Lo Wei: Two

John Carpenter: Two

Bernardo Bertolucci: Two

John G Avildson: Two

Stanley Kubrick: Two

Terry Jones: Two

Don Siegel: Two

Steven Spielberg: Two

Martin Scorsese: Two

Clint Eastwood: Two

George A Romero: Two

Richard Donner: Two

 

Michael Cimino: One

Philip Kaufman: One

Jeannot Szwarc: One

John Milius: One

Irvin Kershner: One

Alan Parker: One

Kevin Connor: One

Ridley Scott: One

George Miller: One

David Lynch: One

Frank Roddam: One

Lucio Fulci: One

Michael Wadleigh: One

Michaelangelo Antonioni: One

Mel Stuart: One

Peter Weir: One

George Lucas: One

Lewis Gilbert: One

Sylvester Stallone: One

Terry Gilliam: One

George P Cosmatos: One

Mike Hodges: One

Richard C Sarafian: One

Alan J Pakula: One

Milos Forman: One

Paul Verhoeven: One

David Cronenberg: One

Brian De Palma: One

Michael Anderson: One

Arthur Hiller: One

Disney: One

Terence Malick: One

Tobe Hooper: One

Nobuhiko Obayashi: One

Franklin J Schaffner: One

Michael Winner: One

Sandy Harbutt: One

Bob Clark: One

Bob Rafelson: One

Brian G Hutton: One

Wes Craven: One

Gordon Hessler: One

Roman Polanski: One

John Boorman: One

Roy Ward Baker: One

Douglas Trumbull: One

Robert Clouse: One

Robin Hardy: One

One hundred films, seventy one directors. That’s down slightly from the sixties – most of the guys who were prominent in the previous decade are here again. The biggest changes this decade are that Hitchcock has completely vanished – he made a few decent films but none which I enjoyed sufficiently to include here, and Kurosawa. While Hitchcock is dead by the time the 80s roll around, Kurosawa was still going. In addition, Disney only made a single inclusion as they entered a bit of a dark age before their second Golden Age would begin later in the 80s. There are no obvious standouts from a director standpoint, though Robert Altman claims the top spot with four. We have a group on five with three movies each – Freidkin, Argento, Hill, Coppola, Lumet, and a bunch with two. A few directors making their debuts in my lists this decade will go on to greater success.

Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

Nightman’s Top Films Of The 1960s – Stats Roundup

Greetings, Glancers! So, older readers of my Oscars posts may recall that I tried to give some stats at the end of the year. It became too difficult to gather metrics and I become too lazy, and lo the posts migrated to the Hades Of Blogs like so many before. The same will likely happen to these summary posts – where I give some ‘interesting’ stats on my favourite films of each decade. It doesn’t mean anything, you won’t gain any insight or pleasure from reading them, and they will be painful to write. Why do it? Well shucks, I’ve always had a thing for hurting myself. ‘Enjoy’!

Number Of Best Picture Nominees: Eighteen (Out of a possible fifty)

Number Of Best Picture Winners: Three (Out of a possible ten)

Number Of Movies In The Top Ten Grossing of The Year: Thirty Six (Out of a possible one hundred)

Number Of Movies Which Were The Top Grosser: Three (Out of a possible ten)

The number of films nominated for Best Picture this year dropped marginally, while my numbers of Best Picture Winner picks went from 6 to three – ostensibly this tells me that I rarely agreed with the Academy choices throughout the decade. On the flip side, the number of Movies in the Top Ten Grossing list increased by fourteen, showing that maybe I was following the crowd and enjoying the mass market movies rather than the critical darlings, although the actual Top Grossing Movie picks went down to three from six. It’s likely a case of me seeing more movies from this decade than the one before, and preferring plenty of movies which were not eligible,were foreign, or were cult classics rather than hits.

Movies By Country In My Top 10:

USA: Fifty Nine

UK: Thirty Two

Italy: Eleven

Japan: Five

France: Five

Germany: Four

Spain: Four

Algeria: One

The USA dominates again, though this being the swinging 60s, the UK figures are probably the best they will ever be. Due to this, the US figures have taken a dip, but the slack has been picked up by Italy who rack up (legs) eleven hits. Again, I imagine that will be the best tally the country will garner in a single decade. Sweden and Canada drop off the list, and Algeria joins.

Movies By Director:

Stanley Kubrick: Four

Robert Aldrich: Four

Sergio Leone: Four

Terence Young: Four

Disney (yeah I know): Three

Roman Polanski: Three

 

Federico Fellini: Two

Blake Edwards: Two

Stanley Kramer: Two

Akira Kurosawa: Two

Alfred Hitchcock: Two

John Sturges: Two

Sidney J Furie: Two

J. Lee Thompson: Two

Norman Jewison: Two

Mike Nichols: Two

Don Chaffey: Two

Lewis Gilbert: Two

Gerald Thomas: Two

 

Jean Luc Godard: One

Mark Robson: One

Masaki Kobayashi: One

Cy Endfield: One

Terence Fisher: One

Arthur Penn: One

Gillo Pontecorvo: One

Peter Yates: One

Sam Peckinpah: One

George Roy Hill: One

Peter R Hunt: One

Peter Collinson: One

Guy Hamilton: One

Robert Rossen: One

Jack Clayton: One

Franklin J Schaffner: One

John Schlesinger: One

Mel Brooks: One

Lindsey Anderson: One

John Boorman: One

Roger Vadim: One

Michael Powell: One

Wolf Rilla: One

Georges Franju: One

Billy Wilder: One

Nobuo Nakagawa: One

Jean Luc Godard: One

Val Guest: One

Marlon Brando: One

Vittorio De Sica: One

Hiroshi Teshigahara: One

Michaelangelo Antonioni: One

Richard Brooks: One

James Hill: One

Dennis Hopper: One

Russ Meyer: One

George A Romero: One

Paul Bogart: One

Guy Green: One

Richard Lester: One

Bryan Forbes: One

Stuart Rosenberg: One

Ken Annakin: One

Andrew Marton: One

Bernhard Wicki: One

Gerd Oswald: One

Darryl F Zanuck: One

John Ford: One

David Lean: One

Robert Mulligan: One

Herk Harvey: One

Francis Ford Coppola: One

Luchino Visconti: One

Sydney: Pollack: One

Jospeh L Mankiewicz: One

Robert Wise: One

One hundred films, seventy five directors. We have some new directors making my stats this decade, while some of the big hitters from the 1950s have dropped back or dropped off completely. Elia Kazan is gone after notching up multiple entries last time around, while both Hitchcock and Kurosawa drop down to two. Kazan made eight films in the 50s, but only four in the sixties, while Hitchcock and Kurosawa similarly eased their output. That means we have no clear front-runners for the 1960s – instead, we have a quartet of quartets, with Kubrick, Young, Leone, and Aldrich earning top honours and Disney and Polanski close behind.

Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

Nightman’s Top Films Of The 1950s – Stats Roundup

Greetings, Glancers! So, older readers of my Oscars posts may recall that I tried to give some stats at the end of the year. It became too difficult to gather metrics and I become too lazy, and lo the posts migrated to the Hades Of Blogs like so many before. The same will likely happen to these summary posts – where I give some ‘interesting’ stats on my favourite films of each decade. It doesn’t mean anything, you won’t gain any insight or pleasure from reading them, and they will be painful to write. Why do it? Well shucks, I’ve always had a thing for hurting myself. ‘Enjoy’!

Number Of Best Picture Nominees: Twenty (Out of a possible fifty)

Number Of Best Picture Winners: Six (Out of a possible ten)

Number Of Movies In The Top Ten Grossing of The Year: Twenty Two (Out of a possible one hundred)

Number Of Movies Which Were The Top Grosser: Six (Out of a possible ten)

What that tells me is that I generally enjoyed the official winner but that I mainly preferred films which were not nominated for the Best Picture Oscar. The Grossing figures are not 100% accurate as some films were released late in a given year, but made up the top grossing figures of the following year – missing my list. Nevertheless, it looks like I was like most people who flocked to see the top pick, though the overall numbers – 22 out of 100, make me look like a hipster or something.

Movies By Country In My Top 10:

USA: Seventy Four

UK: Ten

Japan: Ten

France: Four

Italy: Two

Sweden: Two

Canada: One

No surprises here, with the US dominating as I imagine they will for most decades. The only possible surprise is the low number of different countries, but I’ll attribute that to my own lack of viewing outside the main markets in the 50s.

Movies By Director:

Akira Kurosawa: Eight

Alfred Hitchcock: Eight

Elia Kazan: Five

Disney (yeah I know): Three

Stanley Kubrick: Three

 

John Ford: Two

Anthony Mann: Two

Ida Pupino: Two

Fred Zinnemann: Two

Cecil B DeMille: Two

Billy Wilder: Two

Mervyn LeRoy: Two

Richard Fleischer: Two

Don Siegel: Two

Ingmar Bergman: Two

Nathan H Juran: Two

Terence Fisher: Two

 

Joseph H Lewis: One

Joseph L Mankiewicz: One

Jean Pierre Melville: One

Richard Thorpe: One

Rene Clement: One

Andrew L Stone: One

Howard Hawks: One

Joseph Pevney: One

John Huston: One

Christian Nyby: One

Charles Crichton: One

Joseph Losey: One

Henry Hathaway: One

Brian Desmond Hurst: One

Laszlo Benedek: One

Fritz Lang: One

Eugene Lourie: One

Yasujiro Ozu: One

Edward Dmytryk: One

Federico Fellini: One

Samuel Fuller: One

Ishiro Honda: One

Nicholas Ray: One

Delbert Mann: One

Charles Laughton: One

John Sturges: One

Guy Hamilton: One

Henri-Georges Clouzot: One

Alexander Mackendrick: One

George Stevens: One

Riccardo Freda: One

Mario Bava: One

Joshua Logan: One

Sidney Lumet: One

Jacques Torneur: One

David Lean: One

Stanley Donen: One

Arthur Ripley: One

Irvin Yeaworth: One

Stanley Kramer: One

Orson Welles: One

One hundred films, fifty-nine directors. Kind of, given that I branched the numerous people who worked on my three Disney films as a single person. Also, we had some co-directors, but you get the general idea. As I expected, Kurosawa and Hitchcock completely dominated the decade with eight films each – the only person who comes close to reaching them is Elia Kazan, who I’m actually surprised had so many films in my lists. The vast majority – forty-one – of the directors only made a single appearance, a stat that I don’t believe will be repeated in any other decade, at least not until after 2000 as I will likely continue to pick multiple films by the same group of directors. A handy twelve directors picked up a pair, while only Kubrick and Disney made three.

Let us know your thoughts in the comments!