Police Academy 1 -7

*Reviews for each film originally written in 2003, but merged today into a single post because the reviews are pretty terrible.

Part 1

It may be dumb, not very original, pretty much all of its jokes are based around sex and toilet humour which was mostly insensitive then never mind now, it may have spawned 6 sequels so far, but it is still (for me) one of the funniest movies ever. Legendary (!) characters and timeless sketches ensure that, whether you love it or hate it, it has a major place in comedy movie history.

The Police force under Commandant Lassard decides to bring in a whole new batch of recruits, throwing all past criteria out of the window. Now ex-cons, scumbags, idiots, and men and women of all shapes, sizes and races can apply for a position in the police force by going through a rigorous training scheme. One man, Carey Mahoney, is constantly getting into trouble with the law, though his misdemeanors are small – more of an annoyance than a threat. He is ordered either to join the Police Academy, or be sent to prison. He reluctantly agrees to join, secretly planning to get thrown out immediately. He meets the slacker Jones on the way, a man with the enviable ability to recreate any noise imaginable – with nothing better to do, Jones signs up too. We meet the other recruits – Tackleberry, your typical flag waving NRA member. Hightower  – flower shop owner, almost 7 ft of pure muscle. Hooks, a timid young woman. Barbara, an overweight mummy’s boy. George Martin, who pretends he is Italian to ‘get the ladies’. Karen Thompson, Mahoney’s love interest, and Fackler, a clumsy nerd. Along with these come Copeland and Blankes, antagonists who soon suck up to the man who will be training them – Capt. Harris.

Harris wants the top job and believes that if he can show that Lassard’s plan is a failure, he will be promoted. To do this, he goes about destroying the Cadets’ spirits, trying to expose their weaknesses. However, when a riot breaks out the cadets show their true worth, and prove that they are good enough to become real cops. We also meet Sgt. Callahan, a female officer who likes the men… and Commissioner Reed the man Harris is trying to impress. All the Cadets redeem themselves, overcoming their personal flaws.

During the film each character has very funny moments, Jones with his noises, Mahoney with his tricks, Hooks with her voice, Tackleberry with his guns etc, highlights including The Blue Oyster Bar, the attempt to throw Barbara’s books out a window, and the podium – ‘SLIIIIIIDE!’ scene. Every actor puts in a good performance, the score is a classic, and the plot is merely there to allow the series of skits and vignettes to take place. It may be a no-brainer, but it is therefore perfect to watch with your mates. It is understandable why people would hate this film – I’m the first to admit it’s not big or clever, but it’s better than most critics claim and deserves more love. Some will not find this funny at all, some will, as with anything, but don’t judge it for its foolishness, just watch and laugh.

Part 2

The inane Cadets from the first film get their first assignment when a new gang begins terrorizing the city. Nobody can work out where the massive gang stems from, who their leader is, or where their base is situated, so it comes down to Mahoney to infiltrate the gang by becoming one of them. However, when Mahoney is uncovered by the gang as a cop, his life is in danger and he must rely on his comrades to rescue him. Because of Mauser’s conspiring, Capt Pete Lassard and the recruits have lost their jobs. The gang realise that saving their friend is more important than saving their jobs.

This film marks several changes in the series. Cmdt. Eric Lassard takes a back step and his brother takes over. Harris is replaced by Mauser, and along with him comes Proctor who becomes an instant favourite. Sweetchuck is also on the scene, setting up his consequent relationship with Zed, who here is the gang leader, and one of the best characters in the series. As well as this, Tackleberry falls in love with fellow cop and gun enthusiast Kirkland. We meet Kirkland’s odd family, ensuring many new laughs. As always, the old characters get up to their usual tricks – Jones making noises, and now imitating Bruce Lee, Hooks’s tiny voice, Mahoney’s charm, and Hightower’s strength. It is the new characters who make the most impact though – Zed played perfectly by Bobcat Goldthwait will get the most laughs and Proctor’s stupidity and grovelling becomes a humorous staple for the series. Aside from this, nothing much new happens, there are the same slapstick and sexual innuendo jokes, but that is not to say it is not funny. Again, many people will not find it funny, it is hardly a cinematic masterpiece or work of art, but it is an effective film which will get the laughs from those who love the series.

Part 3

Here we go again…I don’t care what anyone says, this is funny. Yes the series gets worse with each film, but any of the first 4 are better than any American Pie, or any teen comedy of your choosing. The characters have already been established, with Bobcat Goldthwaite as Zed, who is endlessly funny, and Mauser as the rival Cmndt returning from Part 2. The plot this time around sees two rival Police Academies; due to funding one must close, so a series of competitions are set up to see which is better. Mauser recruits Copeland and Banks from Lassard’s school as traitors to ensure that the other side wins, but Mahoney and crew eventually prove they are better. While these movies are not about plot, it’s nice to see some sort of progression in the lives and stories of the characters. Some would say they’re not about comedy either, or anything else, but as a kid, nothing made me laugh more than these films. And they still do. Jones makes loads of noises, Tackleberry watches his in laws punch each other, Mahoney makes his usual comments, but Zed and Procter are my favourites here. The Blue Oyster Bar is back, and other scenes which stick out for me are the arrival of Sweetchuck to the Academy and Zed singing to make a door fall. I see why people find these completely irritating, but I’m pissing myself thinking about them. Indeed, while I was reading some of the (mostly negative) reviews of this, where people were slagging off the parts they didn’t find funny, I was in stitches. May say something about me – but that’s something I’m not ashamed of.

Part 4

The last of the ‘good’ Police Academy movies, probably as Guttenberg left the cast after this one. This is my second favourite in the series after the original, the jokes come thick and fast in skit form, and they manage to have some semblance of a plot to hold it together. Faith in the Police force is low, crime is high, so a new ploy to solve both dilemmas is introduced – COP – Citizens On Patrol, which sees the police force opening its doors to the everyday citizen for training and the opportunity to work along side real Cops. The old gang are assigned to the job and go about trying to find recruits, while Harris and Proctor try to sabotage everything.

New recruits include Corrine Bohrer, a vastly under-used actress, who is excellent in the role, and outshines Sharon Stone, who plays a reporter. Bohrer falls for Zed, providing many comedy moments. Others include an old woman who has the same penchant for violence as Tackleberry, two skateboard punks, and House, a big guy Hightower used to babysit. When there is a prison break out, it’s up to Jones, Mahoney, and the COPs to apprehend the bad guys.

Many funny moments include – the ‘Yumma yumma yumma yumma yuuummma’ scene – The underwater biking scene, quickly followed by the Zed calling Harris ‘jerk’ moment. All the usual antics are back with each character doing, admittedly, the same jokes, but they are used better here than in the other films. The acting is all good, but it is obvious to see why many people hate this. However, this kind of humour will always be funnier to me than two men dressing up in women’s clothing and prancing about with Marilyn Monroe.

Part 5

For fans of the series, this is the point when it all began to go wrong. Mahoney and Zed jumped ship leaving two massive gaps in the cast, and their replacements are not good enough. Of the remaining cast, most seem bored with the formula, and only Proctor, Lassard and Harris seem to be putting in any effort. It is them who get most laughs. The plot sees the recruits flying to Miami as Lassard is retiring and they are holding a huge celebration for him. When Lassard accidentally takes a stash of diamonds with him, the crooks follow him trying to get their diamonds back before their boss kills them. They eventually kidnap Lassard (who thinks it is all part of the celebration), and the cops race to get him back, along with Lassard’s nephew Nick. Naturally Harris and Proctor are around to sabotage things.

As well as the notable loss of Bobcat and Guttenberg, we are missing Kirkland’s family, Sweetchuck, Fackler, and all the Citizens on Patrol except House. Tackleberry, Hightower, Jones, Hooks, and Callahan all seem tired and are only there to say a few lines and show once again their individual traits in decreasing comedic quality. Lassard, Proctor, and Harris get the best laughs and at least try with their performances. McCoy as Guttenberg’s replacement is weak, lacks charm and his stunts are not as funny. Everything becomes increasingly childish, and the whole film looks and feels like a series of short, badly thought out sketches. The bad guys have their moments, but there are a few moments worthy of parts 1-4. Part 6 would be slightly better, 7 would be rubbish, ensuring that they should have left it at 4. However, now that 8 has been announced, and with the recent resurgence of this kind of humour, it could be good. Tackleberry is gone though, and any entry would not be the same without him.

Part 6

This film does not deserve to be in the IMDB bottom 100. Part 7, probably, but this is an improvement over part 5, and a genuine attempt to get back to the origins of the series, that which made it so popular and funny. A trio of criminals are causing havoc in the city, stealing diamonds and outwitting the cops at every turn. It seems they are working for a criminal mastermind who plans to lower property prices for his own eventual gains. The cops along with Lassard, Harris and Proctor try to uncover the crooks and work out who the mastermind is.

This film has many more funny moments than 5 and 7, and the characters get a chance to fully exploit their individual traits, juxtaposed against the 3 criminals. Nick Lassard returns, but still he is no match for Mahoney. The three criminals are pretty good, and provide a few good moments. Once again it is Harris, Proctor and Lassard who shine, but the rest of the recruits seem more interested than they did in 5. Fackler returns to add some more humour, and overall the film is funny. Of course if you don’t like this sort of thing, there is little to recommend it. It is less childish than 5 and 7, there are better performances, and the plot is more linear, rather than seeming like a series of sketches. That said, most of the humour is slapstick, sight gags which have been done better before. However, fans of the series will enjoy it, and remember it is meant to be stupid, not meant to be a cinematic or artistic masterpiece. People reviewing this usually use it to let out all their venom as it is an easy scapegoat. Calm down and save your venom for part seven.

Part 7

Oh well. They go to Russia to help investigate a mafia boss who intends to take over the world with his brainwashing games or something. As a big fan of the series I may be biased, giving other entries higher scores than they may deserve, but this is one movie too many. Hightower and Hooks are gone, as are Nick and Proctor, leaving only a few of the originals. In comes Conners as another Mahoney clone who does okay, and Ron Perlman, a quality actor as the bad guy. For some reason Christopher Lee is also present, he adds some style, but does little. Claire Forlani adds some extreme beauty to the film, and she is pretty good, but clearly should not be making this kind of film. The comedy is wildly unfunny for the most part, mostly slapstick, and there are far too many unfunny noises on the soundtrack meaning we cringe throughout. The remaining actors all seem bored, and only Lassard and Harris get any chuckles. The only really funny moment I can remember is the fact that Lassard just walks into some Russian’s house and becomes part of their family. It is so stupid, yet typically Lassard that you can’t help but laugh. The rest of it is forgettable, and while the remaining characters once again show why they are there, what they do is just not funny. They should have stopped at 4. They definitely should have stopped at 6. Even so, I’m looking forward to 8.

I apologize and must have been several gallons out of my mind while writing these, but let us know in the comments what you think of Police Academy and the series in general!

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Paul David Graf (April 16, 1950 – April 7, 2001)

Remembered primarily for appearing in all of the seven Police Academy movies as the socially shy, but overtly gun-totin’, violence lovin’ Eugene Tackleberry, David Graf was a mainstay throughout many, many 80s and 90s TV shows as a guest actor, and as a voice actor. As a fan of Police Academy my whole life, it was a shock when he died. I remember playing with friends in my younger days, pretending to be cops etc, and many of us wanting to pretend they were Tackleberry. It seems that he was a genuine and funny guy who is fondly remembered by everyone he worked with, a gent in an often cruel and spiteful business.

RIP

Feel free to share your thoughts and memories of David Graf in the comments below.

Top 50 Moments Series – Dialogue, Part 1

Today I introduce the first in a self-indulgent new series nicked from a variety of other sites and blogs. According to my Stats page, most people come here for my music lists (although according to my daily search engine hits, most people come here to see ‘Sigourney Weaver nude’, ‘Scared Kids pics’, and ‘Sigourney Weaver nakdt’…). A lot of people have doing lists like ’25 awesome moments in cinema’ or ’25 favourite scenes from the movies) based off their own favourite films. So, not to left with my pants down, I’ve decided to avoid the Streaker Police and present some of my faves. I created my list of top 150 films on IMDB way back in ‘ought 3’. Although some of those films will likely have been usurped by others since then, I haven’t been arsed to ever change it. So it remains a snapshot of my awesome student self.

Me Being Awesome… but which one?

I’ve decided to expand the number from 25 to 50, because when I looked at some of the films just outside that arbitrary number, I was missing too many classics. I’ll probably throw in a few bonus moments for films not in my top 50 and some of the films (such as Star Wars Trilogy) are on IMDB as a single entity, so I may split those up. So really, it’s a bullshitty mess, and another way for me to talk about movies instead of going out and doing cool stuff like meeting friends and stalking Sigourney Weaver (seriously, every day that search option appears more times than is normal, and I don’t even know why). While most lists have focused on general terms or several different ‘types of moment’ within one list, I think I’ll spread the love and do a dedicated list for each type, ranging from favourite line of dialogue to favourite overall moment. Feel free to give your choices in the comments, or mock me for mine. My list will follow the order of my top 50 films, not necessarily my top 50 moments. Maybe at some point I’ll get round to doing something for TV and music, for those people who actually read this blog. So, without further Apu, I give you:

My 50 (or so) favourite lines of dialogue… FROM THE MOVIES!

1. Star Wars Trilogy. (1977-1983, Lucas, Kershner, Marquand). Well well, these 3 films combined have probably been quoted more by fans, geeks, people who have never even seen them, and by characters in other films, than any other film in the history of ever. Every central character has at least one great line (even some of the bit players get cool dialogue), and for a trilogy packed with central characters you can be sure there will be a moment of pop culture brilliance every few minutes. I’m sure you have your favourites.

A New Hope: Poor little Admiral Motti is frustrated that LORD Vader does not approve of their new BFG and that has not yet found the rebel fortress. In a public forum his complaints are perhaps valid, but he goes about things the wrong way, flatly accusing Vader of being an old fool. If you didn’t know by this stage in the film that Vader was evil, powerful, and fucking awesome, then after he utters his next line, you will. Making the slightest of motions with his hand, Vader performs a deadly choking trick on Motti, who soon regrets ever being born. Vader coldly, simply adds: I find your lack of faith disturbing.

The Empire Strikes Back: As The Empire tries to rebuild after suffering some huge blows in the first film, Skywalker finds himself training in the ways of The Force and being drawn to Vader. Meanwhile loveable rogue Han Solo has been trying his luck with the feisty Princess Leia. In true tragic form though, Solo is captured by the bad guys due to a bounty on his head. Rather than kill Solo, the bad guys wish to freeze him as a prize for the as yet unseen Jabba The Hutt. As Solo is led to his destiny, Leia finally reveals her feelings: ‘I love you’. Han, always striving for the coolest way to respond simply adds: ‘I know’. Does this make him a dick? Does it make him even more epic? Yes yes yes.

My joint favourite quote from Empire is the little exchange between Luke and Yoda where they discuss coming up against their foe. Luke, having spent at least one montage’s worth of training with everyone’s favourite space goblin is full of fire and optimism: ‘I’m not afraid’. Yoda brings him back to earth though with the immortal: ‘you will be… you will be.’

Return Of The Jedi: ‘It’s a trap!’ That is all.

2. The Terminator. (1984, Cameron): Also known as the Greatest Love Story Ever Told, The Terminator has it’s fair share of memorable one liners and dialogue. Everyone knows Arnie’s ‘I’ll be back’, but what about such other classics as ‘Get out’? When you’ve watched the film 50 million times, a few other nuggets of wisdom stand out. Even nothing characters become immortal. From ‘Hey buddy, did you just see a real bright light?’ to ‘Nice night for a walk’ to ‘Yo momma’ and even ‘You got a dead cat in there, or what?’

My favourite line changes from day-to-day, as it does for most of these films. While Sarah is still a little rough around the edges for most of the film, almost every word Reece utters kicks ass from ‘Pain can be controlled’ to ‘I didn’t build the fucking thing!’ to ‘Come with me if you want to live’. Although the entire exchange between Reece and Silberman is gold and has many classics, it’s Reece’s demented speech to Sarah about The Terminator which stands tall: ‘Listen, and understand. That terminator is out there. It can’t be bargained with. It can’t be reasoned with. It doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until you are dead’.

3. T2. (1991, Cameron). With T2, we have no Reece to rely on anymore, but now that Sarah is bad-ass,Arnie is a good guy, and John is around we have even more great one-liners. I could go on about some of the excellent exchanges involving Arnie ‘I need your clothes, your boots, and your motorcycle’…’Your foster parents are dead’… ‘What’s wrong with your eyes?’… ‘Why?’… ‘Uncle Bob?’ and so on, or some of the madness spouted by Sarah to Silverman, or even some of one-off comedy pieces, from ‘shut up, you worthless piece of shit’ to ‘Your foster parents are kinda dicks, huh?’ and ‘The Galleria?’

But no, my choice is the one line which for over a decade was the over-riding message of the film, which sadly (though inevitably?) became a lie as the movies progressed. It’s one of the two central themes stamped all over T2 (the other being ‘Because if a machine, a Terminator, can learn the value of human life, maybe we can too’) and while Sarah carves it into a table, John is the one to say it: ‘There’s no fate but what we make for ourselves’. Live by it, kids!

4. Predator. (1987, McTiernan): I’m gonna have me some fun with this one. Another Arnie classic, and another movie that I always get drawn into watching if I catch a snippet on TV. A lot of this is down to the action of course, but the dialogue ensures this isn’t just another by the numbers run and gun flick. Shane Black even  features, but as an actor, not a writer. While most of the testosterone charged 80s action movies had their fair share of one liners (usually accompanying a death a la Bond), Predator is quotable for most daily situations: waiting for toilet to become available? ‘Son of a bitch is dug in like an Alabama tick’. Someone shows interest in what you’re having for lunch? ‘This stuff will make you a god damned sexual Tyrannosaurus, just like me’. Late for the train? ‘Get to da chopper!’ (particularly good to scream at the top of your lungs to no-one in particular as you race through the crowded station). Anything? ‘Come on… Come on! Do it! Do it!’ My favourite today though comes near the start of the movie as our crack team is trying to take out a group of expendables. Future not-President Jessie Ventura gets hurt and starts to bleed. Poncho tells Jessie he’s bleeding. Jessie replies ‘I ain’t got time to bleed’. I’ll let you think up some appropriate scenarios for usage.

Me, having me some fun… but which one?

5. Robocop. (1987, Verhoeven): It’s always been my opinion that Robocop is the most quotable film ever. I’m fairly certain I could get through a normal day, inlcuding navigating work, family, and friends, by only using Robocop dialogue. Hell, even the watered down TV versions have their own hilarious twists on the original dialogue- ‘you’re gonna be a baaad mother-crusher’ gets used at least once a week. So picking a favourite quote from Robocop would be like Ron Jeremy picking his favourite boob. On the rare occasion that I swear in public, there’s usually a Robocop twist- ‘Fuck you’ becomes (in Steve Minh’s voice) ‘oh.. (pause for shotgun cocking… ooh-er) fuck you!’ Even my Spac Review (link) of Robocop is simply a list of the best lines given the Spac treatment. So, while I’m not terrifying my daughter when she won’t sit still to get her nappy changed by saying ‘Come quietly or there will be…. trouble!’ or instigating divorce proceedings by telling my wife (invoking voice of Clarence) to ‘just gimme my fuckin phone call’ instead of asking where I put my cell phone, what do I think my current fave line is? ‘Tastes like babyfood’? No. ‘Stay out of trouble’? No. ‘Murphy, it’s you’? No. ‘NANANANANANANANANA!’? Close. Jeebus, I really don’t know. Let’s just wrap it up and say that today, my favourite Robocop line is ‘Can you flyyyy, Bobby?’

6. A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 1. (1984, Craven). Wes Craven has a way of being the coolest director, teacher, dad, for teenage audiences. Most of his early films are based around the mistakes of our parents and predecessors and focus on how the kids have to deal with the carnage and aftermath. There is a definite mistrust of the older generation and a cosy, accurate depiction of camaraderie between friends. As a young viewer to all things Freddy, this was a revelation- those whose job it is to protect us may be useless and just as dangerous as  those whose job it is to hurt us. So, Nancy, one of the original and best Final Girls remains an inspiration as she turns to her friends, and finally herself to escape: ‘I’m into survival’.

7. Conan the Barbarian. (1982, Milius): Right wing maestro John Milius never seems to get the credit he deserves- writing such classics as Apocalypse Now, Dirty Harry, and under-appreciated flicks like Big Wednesday. Conan The Barbarian, in my tiny opinion, is shining moment both as a writer and director. There are right field leanings, obviously, but given the source material that sort of thing can be overlooked. Underneath the general carnage there are plenty of philosophical whispers and posturing, and many opposing ideas on power- how to gain it and how to keep it. The opening quote paraphrased from Nietzche – ‘That which does not kill us makes us stronger’ may be overused and as such weakened these days, but it has never been more appropriately attached as here. The opening massacre leads both to Conan’s growth and fate. While the big man doesn’t speak much himself, when he does it is to answer a riddle posed by another, or to scream while beheading someone.

Obviously there are great liners that everyone knows, from Conan’s ‘To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women’ to Valeria’s ‘All the gods, they cannot sever us. If I were dead and you were still fighting for life, I’d come back from the darkness. Back from the pit of hell to fight at your side’. However, Thulsa Doom gets the best lines (and name) and one of his best gets my vote: ‘Contemplate this on the tree of woe’. It’s not only the way that quote rolls beautifully off the tongue, but the way Jones delivers it with such disdain. Throughout the film he seems so bored with everything he sees, so passive with his power, and so pissed when he sees the strong failing to live up to his expectations.

8. Ringu. (1998, Nakata): The Japanese original Ring film is renowned for its scares, its atmosphere, its performances, and its climax. Off the top of my head I couldn’t think of any real zingers, although ‘Frolic in brine, goblins be thine’ has always haunted me ever since I first heard it.

9. Dumb and Dumber. (1994, Farrelly bros): Like most of my top 10, I quote from this one on a weekly basis, borrowing from main and small characters alike. Unfortunately in this part of the world, beverages rarely come grossly super-sized, so I don’t often get the chance to say ‘Big Gulps, huh? All right!’ but for general annoyance ‘We got no food, no jobs… our PETS’ HEADS ARE FALLING OFF!’ has served me well. ‘Let’s not’ (complete with Austrian accent) gets a solid hearing every so often, ‘suck me sideways’ is regular, as is ‘pretty bird!’ I’ll go for something a little different for Dumb and Dumber and pick, not a quote, but a sound. The most annoying sound in the world apparently. ‘EEEEEHHHHHHHHHH!’

10. Police Academy. (1984, Wilson): One of the original spawners of bad sequels, the original Police Academy remains a glorious snapshot of 80s madness. While there are the usual National Lampoon style visual gags and set pieces, these are offset by plenty of humourous pieces of dialogue. Mahoney gets the obvious dialogue, while Jones gets the laugh out loud noise moments, but there are tonnes of smaller, juvenile lines. ‘Your move, Mahomo’ for some reason always makes me giggle, but it is Lassard who gets the best lines. His many monologues and asides always bring laughter tears, my favourite being his podium speech. It’s not necessarily the quality of the dialogue (immature of course) but the delivery, with my highlight being ‘sliiiiiide!’

Come back soon for the next set of films and some more Booker Prize winning dialogue, and don’t forget to leave your favorites from the films mentioned above in the comments, and throw in favourites from films not mentioned!

Police Academy 2: Bowser’s Revenge

The sequel to the greatest comedy ever made had a lot to live up to- would Mahoney still up up to his sexy tricks, or had he settled down? Was Tackleberry still making us roll around the ground in excessive laughings with his hilarious gun-play? Could Jones think of even more new and hilarious noises to enchant us? Most importantly, the serious nature of the storyline- now that our cadets had passed their training could they handle real life on the job as cops on the deadly streets of America? This was sure to be engaging stuff. Sadly this sequel isn’t nearly as good as the first, but thankfully it is even better! It’s by far the best film since the last one, and easily the best in the series apart from the other 6! There are so funny many that I coherent write can’t sentences! I know! Also introduced for the first and only time is my favourite character from the whole series- he may only appear in this film, but he also comes back for the next three! His name be Zeb, and in this he is a bad guy, but don’t be scared cos he’s really good, the same way silk pants are good, and he rubs you the right way by doing funnies and speaking like a weirdo. He is like a cross between Jones and a tramp. He leads the a gang of hoodlums who race around the city on jet skis, throwing punch on the mayor and stealing TVs without even paying for them- that’s not theft like I know it! Anyway, I’m being taken sideways as I keep thinking of a good bit, and remembering, and laughing. Oh no- here comes another! Mudhoney must dress up as a bad guy to infiltrate their gang and same their boss from extinction. I don’t like that Bowser is here instead of Captain Harris- Harris is my favourite, especially in the Blue Oyster or when he has glued bits in his hair! Jones causes diversion by going VVVVVT- BRREEE,AII-AII-OOGGALISHNARFBITZZ!, while Loganberry shoots a pile of boxes with a tank. BLLEEEE- RAWAAK!

Best Scene- There are too many to name, but the one where Sweet Cheeks shoots his own shop is a genuine treat!