Frommers – Japan Day By Day

*Review originally written in 2012 based on a free copy provided by Amazon – Buy it here
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If you’ve ever owned or browsed a Frommer’s Day By Day guide before (or indeed any of the similar publications from Lonely Planet, Time Out et al) then you’ll know what to expect here- an informative, highly detailed, highly useful guide split into a myriad of sections with plenty of imaginative tips, photographs and ideas for any type of traveler from conservative to seasoned, from expensive to cheap. As to expected from a guide like this, the writing can hardly be called entertaining, but is fluid and usable for when you decide or need to dip in to any particular topic. What does stand out though is the focus on local knowledge translated over for those who need to know- the writers obviously know Japan and have a good idea about what the reader/user may want.
Wise Content
Content-wise we have the usual introduction and sections on accommodation, tourist hotspots, dining, museums, travel tips etc etc, as well as some more unusual selections, but what has always been the highlight of the Frommer’s Day by Day series are the Day By Day areas- ready-made plans for either those travelers who (critically) don’t want to think outside the box or (realistically) want to see as much as possible in one particular day. These are well thought out and are the focal point of the guide rather than something tacked on like many other guides and range from ‘Best Of Japan in 1 (or 2 weeks)’ to ‘Best of Tokyo in 1 (or 2, 3) day (s)’. There are also chapters on the major towns, sights, culture and most of these come with a single page map showcasing the area and the nearest subway station. In addition to this we get an extremely handy (though hardly comprehensive) pull-out map of Japan, with the central areas of Tokyo and Kyoto on the other side. I would advise bringing a map of any area you plan on visiting before getting there if possible because although Japan is fairly easy to get around, it can be very overwhelming.
Thanks to a friendly layout, high budget glossy finish, and the knowledge of the writers this is arguably the best guide on Japan on the market though some may find it too large to carry around all day or off-putting due to the scale of content. My advice would be to use this is a guide to create your own ideas and plans, scribble some notes, leave this at the hotel, and take off on your own!

Frommer’s London Free And Dirt Cheap – Book Review

*Note – Review originally written in 2010 based on a free (and dirt cheap) copy provided by Amazon
The Frommer’s Guide To Living Free And Dirt Cheap in London is based on a simple and useful principal- to explain how you can cut corners, save time and money, and experience many of the sights and sensations of one of the World’s most expensive cities without breaking the bank. Being an infrequent visitor to London means I like to pack as much into each visit as possible, and this lightweight and inexpensive book provides many tips, offers much advice, and suggests some alternatives that you may not have thought of. Basically the guide is a more informal and reader friendly version of the Time Out and Lonely Planet guides and offers the same information in a more digestible manner while also telling us of some of the lesser known museums, hotels, bars, and attractions. Of course all the main sights are here- those places which you cannot afford to miss but offers some simple ways to cut costs, although the main focus is on free galleries and sights which will also be less busy. In that sense this book is great for those who have seen all the A-List attractions and now wish to explore the lesser known monuments of history and more curious corners of the massive city.
The book is split into simple sections such as Sleeping, Eating, and Shopping, and into sub-sections like Hostels and Car Boot sales. Well written and informative this also contains useful maps of the various areas of London, opening times for many attractions, and a few itineraries to follow if you are short on inspiration. Although most will continue to go for the big, reliable tourist brands this is an interesting and handy guide for the more adventurous.