Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of The 1950s

*Note – I accidentally messed up my count when writing out the mini-reviews, leaving out my number 1st time around, hence this list being eleven instead of ten. More fun for you!

Greetings, glancers! Hopefully you have all been enjoying my Top Ten Lists by each year, keeping in mind that these are more representative of personal preference than quality. Now that I have completed each year of the 1950s, I thought I would give a quick overview of my Top Ten of the decade and maybe see if any particular year stands out.

11. Marty (1955)

10. Rebel Without A Cause (1955)

9. Godzilla (1954)

8. The Thing From Another World (1951)

7. Invasion Of The Bodysnatchers (1956)

6. Throne Of Blood (1957)

5. Dial M For Murder (1954)

4. Vertigo (1959)

3. Rear Window (1954)

2.  Seven Samurai (1954)

  1.  North By Northwest (1959)

As if there was any doubt, Kurosawa and Hitchcock owned the 50s. They make up the top six positions, and any one of those can be shown to someone who has never seen a Hitchcock or Kurosawa film before, and they’ll be converted. Maybe Throne Of Blood doesn’t quite fall into that category, but it’s a great one to show Kurosawa fans who haven’t yet experienced it.

Marty I saw in my late teens, and it’s probably a film I would not have bothered with for a long time, if not at all, had it not been for my brother’s love of Airwolf. He would seek out any movies or shows featuring the stars of Airwolf and in those early Internet days it wasn’t so easy getting a hold of those. Marty was one of the easiest as it was an Oscar winning film, compared to something like Damnation Alley. Ernest Borgnine of course won an Oscar for the film, well deserved too. It’s just a very sweet, underdog romance, with an unlucky in love guy and gal meeting each other and… you know the rest. It’s like Rocky, but without the fights.

Rebel Without A Cause is James Dean’s most famous, most iconic movie – it’s one of the films you kind of know all about before you ever watch it thanks to the pop cultural imagery. It’s arguably the first, and maybe still the best film about the generation gap as seen primarily from the youth’s POV. It’s basically about three messed up kids who end up in a police station together and we get to see what they’ve done, examine why they may have done it, and then we get all these classic scenes of 50s American teen life – school, fights, car races – almost every cliche in the book comes from this movie. Only the most iconic movies get banned or create a public outcry – this one seeing concerned groups freaking about their children (or neighbour’s children) becoming juvenile delinquents. Only the most iconic films have their own unique curse – stars Dean, Mineo, and Wood all dying in excessively tragic or mysterious circumstances. Throw in Dennis Hopper, Nicholas Ray directing, and it’s a film everyone should see, preferably at the age depicted.

Godzilla is Godzilla. Again, even if you haven’t seen the original, or any of the four million sequels or remakes, you know what it is. There are a lot of iconic movies this year, but the cool thing is that people are always surprised by how good they are when they watch for the first time. Godzilla is of course Japan’s answer to King Kong, with added nuclear paranoia thanks to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and while both films look clunky now when you first see the creatures, the quality of the direction and storytelling quickly makes you forget and sucks you in. I saw this when I was young, and like many people who see Frankenstein when they are young, I sided quickly with ‘the monster’. It take a hell of a lot of skill to make you sympathize with a hundred foot city crushing dinosaur.

The Thing From Another World is not quite as iconic as others on the list, primarily due to it being overshadowed by Carpenter’s definitive version. You probably shouldn’t go showing The Thing to kids but Nyby’s version is a fantastic introduction to  sci fi and horror for kids. Again, you quickly forget the age of the film and get pulled in by the plot, the claustrophobia, and the tension.

Five years later and we get another sci-fi classic of paranoia and tension in Invasion of The Body Snatchers. It’s my least favourite of the film versions (excluding The Invasion because it is balls), but it’s still fantastic – showing how strong the 70s and 90s versions are. Cinematic sci-fi hit a peak this decade as technology began to catch up with ideas – it wouldn’t be till 1977 till the next major leap took place. In this version, which is by far the most hopeful, a Doctor keeps having patients who claim that their relatives and friends have been ‘replaced’ by someone else, even though they look the same – Capgras Delusion. What is initially dismissed as a group hysteria becomes more sinister as the evidence stacks up, and a silent invasion seemingly spreads throw the city. It’s a little on the nose at times, but it’s great fun and another fine introduction for younger viewers.

Throne Of Blood, as mentioned above, is fantastic. It’s shocking. It’s Shakespeare, but not as you know it. It takes the loose plot of Macbeth, transports it to some point in feudal Japan history, and features one of the all time great death scenes. Seriously, every single time someone who hasn’t seen that moment sees it, their mind is blown. Even though Toshiro Mifune is awesome here (he always is), it’s Izuza Yamada as his wife who steals the show – she is utterly terrifying.

Dial M For Murder is underrated. I feel like when critics and fans talk about Hitchcock’s best films, they always leave this out. Maybe because it isn’t as experimental groundbreaking as some of his other works, but few beat it on sheers thrills and tension building. It’s a familiar enough story, but wrapped around multiple double-crosses that by the end you’ll be tied in knots. In classic Sherlock style, it all takes a Wiley detective to unfurl the mess for us and it’s utterly compelling. Grace Kelly and John Williams are superb and it’s dripping with Hitchcock’s trademark wit.

Vertigo is one of the greatest films of all time. I’ve said it before, that there are four films that tick all the boxes from cultural impact to importance to money making to critical and fan acclaim that no others come close to – Star Wars, The Godfather, and this. The other just happens to be on this list too. These are, in my opinion, the four most important films ever made. Where do you begin with Vertigo? It’s probably Hitchcock’s greatest achievement, bearing in mind he also has three other films on this list, and also made the likes of Rebecca, Psycho, The Birds. The film concerns a detective (James Stewart) who retires after his fear of heights causes the death of a fellow cop. He takes on some freelance work from an old friend, tasked with following the friend’s wife around as the friend suspects she is in danger. Maddie, the wife, meanders around San Fransisco, making various deliberate stops before eventually, apparently trying to kill herself. Stewart rescues her, and falls in love with her, but love quickly becomes obsession, deception, death, rebirth, and a whole bunch of other crazy stuff happens. It’s another film which is great fun to watch with someone who knows nothing about it – like all of Hitchcock’s best movies, they keep you guessing, and second guessing – but you’ll be surprised at every turn.

Rear Window makes it three in a row for The Master. It’s a perfect film, a technical marvel, a sign of a man at the height of his powers and craft, a twisting, yet simple story laid out bodies on a slab, and stars Jimmy Stewart, Grace Kelly, and Thelma Ritter – three of the all time greats. You’ll hear people say that films from so long ago couldn’t possibly affect them, scare them, make them laugh – this will do all of those and prove them wrong.

I mentioned the four most important films ever earlier? Seven Samurai is the other one. Has there ever been a three plus hour black and white movie, in Japanese, that rattles by so quickly and holds your attention so closely? Hell, few modern 90 minute Hollywood movies can manager that today. When people are listing their favourite films, it’s easy to gush on about plot but the truth is that even the most complex plot can be boiled down into one or two sentences – Seven Samurai is as simple as it gets – a bunch of bad guys are antagonizing and hurting a bunch of peasant farmers, so the farmers group together and request that (insert title here) protect them and get rid of the bad guys. You’ve seen that movie a hundred times in a hundred different way, but never as good as this. It’s the characterization, the stylized fights which range from chaotic and fast, almost anti-cinematic and anti-Kurosawa, and therefore more realistic, to the ultra-slowed wide shots to show just how badass the Samurai are. You feel each death personally and by the end you look at the time and wonder if you can squeeze in another watch before bed.

What could possibly top all of those movies? Hitchcock doing Bond, before Bond was a thing. North By Northwest is one of those movies which has it all – drama, romance, thrills, laughs, action, suspense – every genre worth covering is covered. The plot is your standard Hitchcock ‘innocent man in wrong place at wrong time’ movie, and sees Carey Grant on the run for a crime he didn’t commit, and while the cops try to catch him and the criminals try to kill him, he just wants to clear his name and if he’s lucky, fuck Eva Marie Saint. Spoiler Alert – the train does enter the tunnel. There’s just so much to love here, mainly stemming from the script and the way the top drawer cast relishes it. You also have the iconic cornfield chase, the iconic Mt Rushmore fight, and a high octane pace that today’s action directors can only dream of.

Let me know in the comments what you think of these movies, and your reasons for not seeing any of them yet!

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Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1962

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Carnival Of Souls (USA)

9: Lawrence Of Arabia (USA/UK)

8: To Kill A Mockingird (USA)

7: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (USA)

6: The Longest Day (USA)

5: What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? (USA)

4: Sanjuro (Japan)

3: Lolita (UK/USA)

2: Cape Fear (USA)

1: Dr No (UK)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Four

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Four (Including The Winner)

Police Academy 1 -7

*Reviews for each film originally written in 2003, but merged today into a single post because the reviews are pretty terrible.

Part 1

It may be dumb, not very original, pretty much all of its jokes are based around sex and toilet humour which was mostly insensitive then never mind now, it may have spawned 6 sequels so far, but it is still (for me) one of the funniest movies ever. Legendary (!) characters and timeless sketches ensure that, whether you love it or hate it, it has a major place in comedy movie history.

The Police force under Commandant Lassard decides to bring in a whole new batch of recruits, throwing all past criteria out of the window. Now ex-cons, scumbags, idiots, and men and women of all shapes, sizes and races can apply for a position in the police force by going through a rigorous training scheme. One man, Carey Mahoney, is constantly getting into trouble with the law, though his misdemeanors are small – more of an annoyance than a threat. He is ordered either to join the Police Academy, or be sent to prison. He reluctantly agrees to join, secretly planning to get thrown out immediately. He meets the slacker Jones on the way, a man with the enviable ability to recreate any noise imaginable – with nothing better to do, Jones signs up too. We meet the other recruits – Tackleberry, your typical flag waving NRA member. Hightower  – flower shop owner, almost 7 ft of pure muscle. Hooks, a timid young woman. Barbara, an overweight mummy’s boy. George Martin, who pretends he is Italian to ‘get the ladies’. Karen Thompson, Mahoney’s love interest, and Fackler, a clumsy nerd. Along with these come Copeland and Blankes, antagonists who soon suck up to the man who will be training them – Capt. Harris.

Harris wants the top job and believes that if he can show that Lassard’s plan is a failure, he will be promoted. To do this, he goes about destroying the Cadets’ spirits, trying to expose their weaknesses. However, when a riot breaks out the cadets show their true worth, and prove that they are good enough to become real cops. We also meet Sgt. Callahan, a female officer who likes the men… and Commissioner Reed the man Harris is trying to impress. All the Cadets redeem themselves, overcoming their personal flaws.

During the film each character has very funny moments, Jones with his noises, Mahoney with his tricks, Hooks with her voice, Tackleberry with his guns etc, highlights including The Blue Oyster Bar, the attempt to throw Barbara’s books out a window, and the podium – ‘SLIIIIIIDE!’ scene. Every actor puts in a good performance, the score is a classic, and the plot is merely there to allow the series of skits and vignettes to take place. It may be a no-brainer, but it is therefore perfect to watch with your mates. It is understandable why people would hate this film – I’m the first to admit it’s not big or clever, but it’s better than most critics claim and deserves more love. Some will not find this funny at all, some will, as with anything, but don’t judge it for its foolishness, just watch and laugh.

Part 2

The inane Cadets from the first film get their first assignment when a new gang begins terrorizing the city. Nobody can work out where the massive gang stems from, who their leader is, or where their base is situated, so it comes down to Mahoney to infiltrate the gang by becoming one of them. However, when Mahoney is uncovered by the gang as a cop, his life is in danger and he must rely on his comrades to rescue him. Because of Mauser’s conspiring, Capt Pete Lassard and the recruits have lost their jobs. The gang realise that saving their friend is more important than saving their jobs.

This film marks several changes in the series. Cmdt. Eric Lassard takes a back step and his brother takes over. Harris is replaced by Mauser, and along with him comes Proctor who becomes an instant favourite. Sweetchuck is also on the scene, setting up his consequent relationship with Zed, who here is the gang leader, and one of the best characters in the series. As well as this, Tackleberry falls in love with fellow cop and gun enthusiast Kirkland. We meet Kirkland’s odd family, ensuring many new laughs. As always, the old characters get up to their usual tricks – Jones making noises, and now imitating Bruce Lee, Hooks’s tiny voice, Mahoney’s charm, and Hightower’s strength. It is the new characters who make the most impact though – Zed played perfectly by Bobcat Goldthwait will get the most laughs and Proctor’s stupidity and grovelling becomes a humorous staple for the series. Aside from this, nothing much new happens, there are the same slapstick and sexual innuendo jokes, but that is not to say it is not funny. Again, many people will not find it funny, it is hardly a cinematic masterpiece or work of art, but it is an effective film which will get the laughs from those who love the series.

Part 3

Here we go again…I don’t care what anyone says, this is funny. Yes the series gets worse with each film, but any of the first 4 are better than any American Pie, or any teen comedy of your choosing. The characters have already been established, with Bobcat Goldthwaite as Zed, who is endlessly funny, and Mauser as the rival Cmndt returning from Part 2. The plot this time around sees two rival Police Academies; due to funding one must close, so a series of competitions are set up to see which is better. Mauser recruits Copeland and Banks from Lassard’s school as traitors to ensure that the other side wins, but Mahoney and crew eventually prove they are better. While these movies are not about plot, it’s nice to see some sort of progression in the lives and stories of the characters. Some would say they’re not about comedy either, or anything else, but as a kid, nothing made me laugh more than these films. And they still do. Jones makes loads of noises, Tackleberry watches his in laws punch each other, Mahoney makes his usual comments, but Zed and Procter are my favourites here. The Blue Oyster Bar is back, and other scenes which stick out for me are the arrival of Sweetchuck to the Academy and Zed singing to make a door fall. I see why people find these completely irritating, but I’m pissing myself thinking about them. Indeed, while I was reading some of the (mostly negative) reviews of this, where people were slagging off the parts they didn’t find funny, I was in stitches. May say something about me – but that’s something I’m not ashamed of.

Part 4

The last of the ‘good’ Police Academy movies, probably as Guttenberg left the cast after this one. This is my second favourite in the series after the original, the jokes come thick and fast in skit form, and they manage to have some semblance of a plot to hold it together. Faith in the Police force is low, crime is high, so a new ploy to solve both dilemmas is introduced – COP – Citizens On Patrol, which sees the police force opening its doors to the everyday citizen for training and the opportunity to work along side real Cops. The old gang are assigned to the job and go about trying to find recruits, while Harris and Proctor try to sabotage everything.

New recruits include Corrine Bohrer, a vastly under-used actress, who is excellent in the role, and outshines Sharon Stone, who plays a reporter. Bohrer falls for Zed, providing many comedy moments. Others include an old woman who has the same penchant for violence as Tackleberry, two skateboard punks, and House, a big guy Hightower used to babysit. When there is a prison break out, it’s up to Jones, Mahoney, and the COPs to apprehend the bad guys.

Many funny moments include – the ‘Yumma yumma yumma yumma yuuummma’ scene – The underwater biking scene, quickly followed by the Zed calling Harris ‘jerk’ moment. All the usual antics are back with each character doing, admittedly, the same jokes, but they are used better here than in the other films. The acting is all good, but it is obvious to see why many people hate this. However, this kind of humour will always be funnier to me than two men dressing up in women’s clothing and prancing about with Marilyn Monroe.

Part 5

For fans of the series, this is the point when it all began to go wrong. Mahoney and Zed jumped ship leaving two massive gaps in the cast, and their replacements are not good enough. Of the remaining cast, most seem bored with the formula, and only Proctor, Lassard and Harris seem to be putting in any effort. It is them who get most laughs. The plot sees the recruits flying to Miami as Lassard is retiring and they are holding a huge celebration for him. When Lassard accidentally takes a stash of diamonds with him, the crooks follow him trying to get their diamonds back before their boss kills them. They eventually kidnap Lassard (who thinks it is all part of the celebration), and the cops race to get him back, along with Lassard’s nephew Nick. Naturally Harris and Proctor are around to sabotage things.

As well as the notable loss of Bobcat and Guttenberg, we are missing Kirkland’s family, Sweetchuck, Fackler, and all the Citizens on Patrol except House. Tackleberry, Hightower, Jones, Hooks, and Callahan all seem tired and are only there to say a few lines and show once again their individual traits in decreasing comedic quality. Lassard, Proctor, and Harris get the best laughs and at least try with their performances. McCoy as Guttenberg’s replacement is weak, lacks charm and his stunts are not as funny. Everything becomes increasingly childish, and the whole film looks and feels like a series of short, badly thought out sketches. The bad guys have their moments, but there are a few moments worthy of parts 1-4. Part 6 would be slightly better, 7 would be rubbish, ensuring that they should have left it at 4. However, now that 8 has been announced, and with the recent resurgence of this kind of humour, it could be good. Tackleberry is gone though, and any entry would not be the same without him.

Part 6

This film does not deserve to be in the IMDB bottom 100. Part 7, probably, but this is an improvement over part 5, and a genuine attempt to get back to the origins of the series, that which made it so popular and funny. A trio of criminals are causing havoc in the city, stealing diamonds and outwitting the cops at every turn. It seems they are working for a criminal mastermind who plans to lower property prices for his own eventual gains. The cops along with Lassard, Harris and Proctor try to uncover the crooks and work out who the mastermind is.

This film has many more funny moments than 5 and 7, and the characters get a chance to fully exploit their individual traits, juxtaposed against the 3 criminals. Nick Lassard returns, but still he is no match for Mahoney. The three criminals are pretty good, and provide a few good moments. Once again it is Harris, Proctor and Lassard who shine, but the rest of the recruits seem more interested than they did in 5. Fackler returns to add some more humour, and overall the film is funny. Of course if you don’t like this sort of thing, there is little to recommend it. It is less childish than 5 and 7, there are better performances, and the plot is more linear, rather than seeming like a series of sketches. That said, most of the humour is slapstick, sight gags which have been done better before. However, fans of the series will enjoy it, and remember it is meant to be stupid, not meant to be a cinematic or artistic masterpiece. People reviewing this usually use it to let out all their venom as it is an easy scapegoat. Calm down and save your venom for part seven.

Part 7

Oh well. They go to Russia to help investigate a mafia boss who intends to take over the world with his brainwashing games or something. As a big fan of the series I may be biased, giving other entries higher scores than they may deserve, but this is one movie too many. Hightower and Hooks are gone, as are Nick and Proctor, leaving only a few of the originals. In comes Conners as another Mahoney clone who does okay, and Ron Perlman, a quality actor as the bad guy. For some reason Christopher Lee is also present, he adds some style, but does little. Claire Forlani adds some extreme beauty to the film, and she is pretty good, but clearly should not be making this kind of film. The comedy is wildly unfunny for the most part, mostly slapstick, and there are far too many unfunny noises on the soundtrack meaning we cringe throughout. The remaining actors all seem bored, and only Lassard and Harris get any chuckles. The only really funny moment I can remember is the fact that Lassard just walks into some Russian’s house and becomes part of their family. It is so stupid, yet typically Lassard that you can’t help but laugh. The rest of it is forgettable, and while the remaining characters once again show why they are there, what they do is just not funny. They should have stopped at 4. They definitely should have stopped at 6. Even so, I’m looking forward to 8.

I apologize and must have been several gallons out of my mind while writing these, but let us know in the comments what you think of Police Academy and the series in general!

Nightman’s Top Ten Films of 1960

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Village Of The Damned (UK)

9: Eyes Without A Face (France)

8: The Apartment (USA)

7: Jigoku (Japan)

6: La Dolce Vita (Italy)

5: Breathless (France)

4: Spartacus (USA)

3: Peeping Tom (UK)

2: Psycho (USA)

1: The Magnificent Seven (USA)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three (Including the top grossing)

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: One (The Winner)

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1958

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Thunder Road (USA)

9: The Blob (USA)

8: The Vikings (USA)

7: The Defiant Ones (USA)

6: The Magician (Sweden)

5: The Hidden Fortress (Japan)

4: The 7th Voyage Of Sinbad (USA)

3: Touch Of Evil (USA)

2: Dracula (UK)

1: Vertigo (USA)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: One

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: One

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1957

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Sayonara (USA)

9: 20 Million Miles To Earth (USA)

8: Funny Face (USA)

7: The Lower Depths (Japan)

6: The Bridge On The River Kwai (UK/USA)

5: The Seventh Seal (Sweden)

4: Paths Of Glory (USA)

3: Night Of The Demon (UK)

2: 12 Angry Men (USA)

1: Throne Of Blood (Japan)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Two (including the top grossing film)

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Three (including the winner)

Suicide Club

After I first got into J-Horror, and Asian Cinema in general, I began to compile lists of all the must see movies. Buying those lovely Tartan Asia Extreme DVDs by the basket load helped, as each came with a bunch of trailers for related films or ‘titles coming soon’. Suicide Club grabbed my eye fairly early on – how could it not, what with its amusingly macabre premise, trailer and synopsis? Who wouldn’t want to watch a film which opens with a bunch of school-girls throwing themselves under the wheels of a train? Idiots, that’s who!

The film uses shock value to get punters into seats and to appease the sort of weirdos like me who would choose to watch something like this, but shock value is not at the centre of the story. There’s a lot more to Suicide Club, but it struggles to fit in any niche. While the film does begin with some out of place music playing over the scenes of the train approaching, the girls holding hands, and the girls jumping, the hilarious blood effects are over the top enough to make you assume it’s some ridiculous comedy. Then it becomes a detective mystery. Then it becomes a horror. Then it becomes a satire before finally going completely off the rails (pardon the pun). It’s a film which I can only imagine doesn’t know what it wants to be, and none of the things it tries to be are pulled off very well. There is little weight put onto the subject of suicide, the satire directed at the subject of cults isn’t particularly pointed, and the mystery is so convoluted as to never be adequately understood. If anything it’s the early moments which work best – before you really know anything and your imagination is left to fill in the blanks. These take place in some sort of hospital where the tension is racked admirably high thanks to an open window, a couple of nurses, and a night watchman. It was in these moments that the slow pace and bizarre twists conspired to make me believe that a long-haired ghost was going to pop out.

Unfortunately these scenes soon give way as we meet the cops tasked with working out what the hell is going on and why all these people are killing themselves. What’s tying the victims together? Are they even victims in the first place? Who’s the creepy kid who keeps phoning the cops and offering philosophical vagueries? What’s with the sports bag left at the scenes of death? Is the pop group significant? Who is going to be next? You’ll be asking yourself these questions as much as the characters are – Sion Sono seems to finding his feet as a director as much as anything – playing with expectation but in the end abandoning a coherent story with involving characters for a spattering of themes and violence which only loosely ties together. The film will certainly stay with you, and may be more rewarding with a second viewing, but the director has since gone on to make vastly more essential films.

Let us know in the comments what you thought of Suicide Club!