Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1975

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Nashville (US)

9: Barry Lyndon (UK/US)

8: Picnic At Hanging Rock (OZ)

7: Hard Times (US)

6: Deep Red (Italy)

5: The Land That Time Forgot (UK/US)

4: Monty Python And The Holy Grail (UK)

3: Dog Day Afternoon (US)

2: One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (US)

1: Jaws (US)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three (including the top grossing)

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Five (including the winner)

Don’t forget to tune in on Thursday for my favourite films of 1976!

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Nightman Top Ten Films Of 1974

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Black Christmas (CAN)

9: Stone (OZ)

8: Blazing Saddles (US)

7: Death Wish (US)

6: Chinatown (US)

5: Young Frankenstein (US)

4: The Golden Voyage Of Sinbad (UK)

3: The Man With The Golden Gun (UK)

2: The Godfather Part 2 (US)

1: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (US)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three (Including the top grossing film)

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Two (Including the winner)

Stay tuned on Tuesday for my favourite films of 1975!

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1973

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Badlands (US)

9: Robin Hood (US)

8: High Plains Drifter (US)

7: Mean Streets (US)

6: Serpico (US)

5: Don’t Look Now (UK/Italy)

4: The Wicker Man (UK)

3: The Exorcist (US)

2: Enter The Dragon (HK/US)

1: Live And Let Die (UK)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: One

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1972

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Silent Running (US)

9: Last Tango In Paris (France/Italy)

8: The Getaway (US)

7: Asylum (UK)

6: Deliverance (US)

5: Game Of Death (HK)

4: The Last House On The Left (US)

3: Fist Of Fury (HK)

2: Way Of The Dragon (HK)

1: The Godfather (US)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three (including the top grossing)

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Two (including the winner)

Tune in on Tuesday for my favourite films of 1973, and don’t forget to check out my more in depth choices by decade!

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1971

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Vanishing Point (USA)

9: McCabe And Mrs Miller (USA)

8: Walkabout (UK/OZ)

7: Straw Dogs (US/UK)

6: The French Connection (USA)

5: Get Carter (UK)

4: Dirty Harry (USA)

3: Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory (USA)

2: The Big Boss (HK/Thailand)

1: A Clockwork Orange (USA/UK)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Two (Including the winner)

Don’t forget, my favourite films of 1972 will be coming on Thursday!

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1970

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Woodstock (USA)

9: Zabriskie Point (USA)

8: MASH (USA)

7: Brewster McCloud (USA)

6: The Conformist (Italy/France/Germany)

5: Joe (USA)

4: The Bird With The Crystal Plumage (Italy/Germany)

3: Patton (USA)

2: Five Easy Pieces (USA)

1: Kelly’s Heroes (USA)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Three (Including the winner)

Nightman’s Top Films Of The 1960s – Stats Roundup

Greetings, Glancers! So, older readers of my Oscars posts may recall that I tried to give some stats at the end of the year. It became too difficult to gather metrics and I become too lazy, and lo the posts migrated to the Hades Of Blogs like so many before. The same will likely happen to these summary posts – where I give some ‘interesting’ stats on my favourite films of each decade. It doesn’t mean anything, you won’t gain any insight or pleasure from reading them, and they will be painful to write. Why do it? Well shucks, I’ve always had a thing for hurting myself. ‘Enjoy’!

Number Of Best Picture Nominees: Eighteen (Out of a possible fifty)

Number Of Best Picture Winners: Three (Out of a possible ten)

Number Of Movies In The Top Ten Grossing of The Year: Thirty Six (Out of a possible one hundred)

Number Of Movies Which Were The Top Grosser: Three (Out of a possible ten)

The number of films nominated for Best Picture this year dropped marginally, while my numbers of Best Picture Winner picks went from 6 to three – ostensibly this tells me that I rarely agreed with the Academy choices throughout the decade. On the flip side, the number of Movies in the Top Ten Grossing list increased by fourteen, showing that maybe I was following the crowd and enjoying the mass market movies rather than the critical darlings, although the actual Top Grossing Movie picks went down to three from six. It’s likely a case of me seeing more movies from this decade than the one before, and preferring plenty of movies which were not eligible,were foreign, or were cult classics rather than hits.

Movies By Country In My Top 10:

USA: Fifty Nine

UK: Thirty Two

Italy: Eleven

Japan: Five

France: Five

Germany: Four

Spain: Four

Algeria: One

The USA dominates again, though this being the swinging 60s, the UK figures are probably the best they will ever be. Due to this, the US figures have taken a dip, but the slack has been picked up by Italy who rack up (legs) eleven hits. Again, I imagine that will be the best tally the country will garner in a single decade. Sweden and Canada drop off the list, and Algeria joins.

Movies By Director:

Stanley Kubrick: Four

Robert Aldrich: Four

Sergio Leone: Four

Terence Young: Four

Disney (yeah I know): Three

Roman Polanski: Three

 

Federico Fellini: Two

Blake Edwards: Two

Stanley Kramer: Two

Akira Kurosawa: Two

Alfred Hitchcock: Two

John Sturges: Two

Sidney J Furie: Two

J. Lee Thompson: Two

Norman Jewison: Two

Mike Nichols: Two

Don Chaffey: Two

Lewis Gilbert: Two

Gerald Thomas: Two

 

Jean Luc Godard: One

Mark Robson: One

Masaki Kobayashi: One

Cy Endfield: One

Terence Fisher: One

Arthur Penn: One

Gillo Pontecorvo: One

Peter Yates: One

Sam Peckinpah: One

George Roy Hill: One

Peter R Hunt: One

Peter Collinson: One

Guy Hamilton: One

Robert Rossen: One

Jack Clayton: One

Franklin J Schaffner: One

John Schlesinger: One

Mel Brooks: One

Lindsey Anderson: One

John Boorman: One

Roger Vadim: One

Michael Powell: One

Wolf Rilla: One

Georges Franju: One

Billy Wilder: One

Nobuo Nakagawa: One

Jean Luc Godard: One

Val Guest: One

Marlon Brando: One

Vittorio De Sica: One

Hiroshi Teshigahara: One

Michaelangelo Antonioni: One

Richard Brooks: One

James Hill: One

Dennis Hopper: One

Russ Meyer: One

George A Romero: One

Paul Bogart: One

Guy Green: One

Richard Lester: One

Bryan Forbes: One

Stuart Rosenberg: One

Ken Annakin: One

Andrew Marton: One

Bernhard Wicki: One

Gerd Oswald: One

Darryl F Zanuck: One

John Ford: One

David Lean: One

Robert Mulligan: One

Herk Harvey: One

Francis Ford Coppola: One

Luchino Visconti: One

Sydney: Pollack: One

Jospeh L Mankiewicz: One

Robert Wise: One

One hundred films, seventy five directors. We have some new directors making my stats this decade, while some of the big hitters from the 1950s have dropped back or dropped off completely. Elia Kazan is gone after notching up multiple entries last time around, while both Hitchcock and Kurosawa drop down to two. Kazan made eight films in the 50s, but only four in the sixties, while Hitchcock and Kurosawa similarly eased their output. That means we have no clear front-runners for the 1960s – instead, we have a quartet of quartets, with Kubrick, Young, Leone, and Aldrich earning top honours and Disney and Polanski close behind.

Let us know your thoughts in the comments!