Best Cast – 1967

My Nominations: Bonnie And Clyde. The Dirty Dozen. Casino Royale. The Graduate. Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner. In The Heat Of The Night.

Only one large/traditional ensemble this time around, with The Dirty Dozen featuring a cast of established heavy hitters, stars of the day, and up and comers. We have the top brass led by the likes of Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, and Lee Marvin who recruit such luminaries as John Cassavetes, Charles Bronson, Jim Brown, Telly Savalas and more. Many of the names above give performances which have become cult favourites and it is interesting to see the various stars interact. Casino Royale also features a large cast, with many cameos, but the majority of parts are minor though still add to the overall charm – Peter Sellers, David Niven, Ursula Andress, Orson Welles, and Woody Allen lead the way. The remaining films have a more condensed cast where each actor has a bigger role to chew on – Bonnie And Clyde sees Gene Hackman, Gene Wilder, and others alongside the central pairing of Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway while The Graduate features Dustin Hoffman struggling through love, life and boredom with Anne Bancroft, Katherine Ross, and Murray Hamilton. Sidney Poitier stars in the final two films, alongside Katerine Hepburn, Spencer Tracey, and Katherine Houghton in Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner and Rod Steiger and Warren Oats in In The Heat Of The Night. This is a very difficult one to call as each of the nominated films have stellar casts, by and large given terrific performances  -each is as deserving of a win as the next.

My Winner: Bonnie And Clyde

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Which of the above movies do you think has the Best Cast – or which movie of 1967 that I missed has a better cast? Let us know in the comments!

Best Stunt Work – 1967

My Nominations: The Dirty Dozen. You Only Live Twice. Dragon Gate Inn. Bonnie And Clyde.

I only have four nominations for this category this year, a year in which character drama was more popular than action and comedy movies. The Dirty Dozen has war games aplenty, with the recruits going through various scrapes in their training before the final attack and escape. While there isn’t anything groundbreaking, the action comes thick and fast, thanks to an extensive stunt team including Ken Buckle – a Bond veteran, Gerry Crampton (Raiders Of The Lost Ark), and Rick Lester, a man who was once in line to take over from Sean Connery as Bond. Speaking of Bond, You Only Live Twice was the series most action heavy movie to that point, with ninja’s scaling down volcanoes, helicopter battles in the sky, and all manner of fist fights – performers including Peter Fanene Maivia (WWE legend and grandfather of The Rock), Tex Fuller (Brazil), and K.H Wallis (pilot of Little Nellie). Ying-Chieh Han (The Big Boss himself) provides the thrills in Dragon Gate Inn while Mary Statler (Paint Your Wagon), Bob Harris (Commando),  and Lucky Mosely (Walker, Texas Ranger) among others provide the carnage in Bonnie And Clyde. 

My Winner: You Only Live Twice

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Which film of 1967 do you think has the best Stunts. Which stunts or stunt performers would you like to recognise? Let us know in the comments!

Best Writing (Original) – 1967

Official Nominations: William Rose (Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner), David Newman, Robert Benton (Bonnie And Clyde), Robert Kaufman, Norman Lear (Divorce, America Style), Jorge Semprun (The War Is Over), Frederic Raphael (Two For The Road).

William Rose was the official winner this year, his screenplay for Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner showing a lighter comedic touch than his previous offerings. Altogether less subtle and light is Kaufman and Lear’s Divorce American Style which offers strong satire but feels dated now. Jorge Semprum’s nomination seems like an unusual choice – decent script but a film which few will recall now, and Raphael’s work on Two For The Road is a bold choice but deserved giving the ingenuity of the storytelling on offer. My winner though goes to Newman and Benton’s riproaring Bonnie And Clyde, one of the finest examples of twisting the truth to tell a new tale.

My Winner: Bonnie And Clyde.

Bonnie & Clyde Dunaway Beatty Pollard

My Nominations: Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner. Bonnie And Clyde. Two For The Road. The Fearless Vampire Killers. The Firemen’s Ball. Le Samourai. The Shooting.

I have added a selection of four movies to my personal nominations, a mixture of satire, farce, crime, and existential drama, with my winning vote going to Polanski and Gerard Brach’s The Fearless Vampire Killers.

My Winner: The Fearless Vampire Killers

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Which movie of 1967 do you think has the Best Original Screenplay? Let us know in the comments!

Best Cinematography: 1967

Official Nominations: Bonnie And Clyde. Camelot. Doctor Dolittle. In Cold Blood. The Graduate.

An unsurprising mix of movies make the cut this year, with Bonnie And Clyde picking up the official win, Burnett Guffey ensuring that his experience of shooting noir films gave a certain edge to the proceedings. Both Camelot and Doctor Doolittle look stunning but are let down in other areas by being too generic. The shooting of authentic locales with black and white photography gives In Cold Blood a unique look while The Graduate manages to capture a moment in time which remains both timeless and fixed.

My Winner: Bonnie And Clyde.

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My Nominations: Bonnie And Clyde. Doctor Dolittle. In Cold Blood. The Graduate. One Million Years BC. Le Samourai. The Fearless Vampire Killers. The Shooting.

I’ve added a few unlikely but worthy picks for my personal nominations, with perhaps the most obvious being One Million Years B.C – a film known for iconic visual moments rather than plot, acting, or direction. The Mediterranean beaches are transformed into realistically threatening pre-historic vistas and as a child watching we never doubt that what we’re seeing isn’t real. The rarely seen The Shooting has a stylized vision which few Westerns have emulated while Le Samourai went on to be highly influential. Finally, The Fearless Vampire Killers is a bizarre mixture of surreal dreamlike imagery and Hammer style atmospheric shots.

My Winner: The Fearless Vampire Killers.

Moon, Sleigh & Snow - The Fearless Vampire Hunters (1967)

Which film of 1967 do you feel has the Best Cinematography? Let us know in the comments!