Nightman’s Least Favourite Films Of 2010

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Here we go. Now, you might be asking why I’m starting with 2010. I’ve mentioned this before, but if you’re new around these here parts, I rarely watch films as they are released. I have more important things to do (like beat the world record for most sit-ups in a minute). But I get to them eventually. At time of writing – 29th December 2019 – I looked at the films released in 2018 and saw that I haven’t seen one of the top ten grossing movies. Not Infinity War, not Black Panther, not Incredibles 2, Fallen Kingdom, Aquaman, Bohemian Rhapsody, Venom, Fallout, Deadpool 2, or Fantastic Beasts. What a naughty movie boy I am! I’ll get to them, but only one or two jump out at me as something I’d actually want to see beyond mere obligation.

So rather than start in media decennium, I rounded down to 2010. I’ll work my way back to 1950 and then cover 2011-2019. One more note – I generally now avoid movies I don’t think I’ll like and a lot of the ultra low budget, amateur, and obviously crap films. I almost never enjoy ‘so bad it’s good’ stuff, unless I’m completely off my tits. In other words, my lists aren’t going to contain Sharkopter Vs Megacock or Fifty Shades Shittier.

Now, you may want to go back and read my original post about why I’m doing these lists. Remember, in most cases I don’t hate these films – they may have disappointed me because I was so hyped, they may have been forced upon me while I sat there dreaming about murdering every single person on screen, or they may be some bloated blockbuster with a huge budget but zero ambition beyond making more money – money which could have saved hundreds of lives had it been put into a different endeavour. Some of your favourite movies may be included. If you get salty – man up – opinions can’t hurt you. By all means go ahead and love your movie – doesn’t mean I will, doesn’t mean it should change how you feel about it. I’m just some guy, just like you.

Lets get onto the movies in 2010 which didn’t do it for me – these are in no particular order.

Alice In Wonderland

Weeew, what a mess. I’m torn between saying this looks good, imaginative, bright, or just uncanny valley terrible. When you throw this much money at a film, you’d better be sure it looks amazing. It’s a great start having Tim Burton in the Director’s Chair, as he’s one of Hollywood’s visual pioneers. Plus you get a terrific cast – it should have been spellbinding. But it’s just an incoherent mess. Just like the original text. I’ve never been a fan of Carroll’s story, I’m not so precious as to not call it out as a fraud. There are other, better works of fantasy fiction in a similar vein, and its a book whose moments and characters and ideas are better than their execution. The film can’t really be faulted for absorbing those flaws.

What it can be faulted for is its descent into unforgivable camp, for making otherwise good actors deliver cringe after cringe, and for further making Tim Burton look like just another big budget stooge with no clue how to build character, garner emotion, tell a story, or elicit anything from the audience other than a confused yawn.

Daybreakers

For reasons far beyond me, this has popped up in a few year end and decade end lists of best, or most underrated horror movies lists. It’s neither of those things. It takes an… okay premise, and then turns the whole thing into Blade, if Blade was a Hallmark drama. They say the biggest sin a horror movie can commit is to not be scary. I’d go one further and say the greatest sin any movie can commit is to be boring. This is boring, it’s not scary, and it looks as drab as a Ken Loach film if he had a 1000 quid budget and a single cloakroom to film within. Years on, I struggle to recall anything which happened in the film beyond Sam Neill sitting behind a table.

The Wolfman

The Wolfman never really had a shot. As far as classic monsters go, the werewolf has never really had a great horror film. Not the Universal Classics, nothing from Hammer – the best of the bunch, by some distance, needed to resort to comedy to make what should be an interesting character, well, interesting. Credit for retaining some sort of Gothic approach and for attempting to elevate the thing by throwing legitimate actors at a script written by someone more interested in forced romance than genuine trauma. It feels like nobody gives a shit, outside of an enthused, gloomy Del Toro. The problem is it’s laughably predictable even without seeing any other version of the story. You know exactly how the film will play out, and how it will end. Within the opening ten minutes, if you haven’t worked out precisely how the final minutes will go, this must be your first movie – congratulations on finally entering the world of Cinema, you must be excited to discover all of these wonderful new fangled movie things the kids have been talking about. It doesn’t even look that interesting, and Anthony Hopkins looks as if he is not only channeling Brian Blessed, but has swallowed  him too. Go watch the 1941 version.

Shutter Island

Martin Scorsese and horror – finally. How could it go wrong? It barely goes right. Every twist is signposted, every performance is ridiculous, and if you’ve ever seen, literally any movie set in an asylum, you know how this one will go. The film insults the audience by treating us like naive children, and it again commits those cardinal sins – it’s boring, it’s not scary. In its defence it claims to be a psychological thriller – a term people use when their film lacks the balls to be Horror. Perhaps most infuriating it made a crapload of money when there were a bunch of more deserving movies which passed unseen or under-praised.

A Nightmare On Elm Street

Wes Craven’s 1984 classic is my favourite horror movie of all time, and it’s a Top 5 for me regardless of genre. So I come in to any remake or sequel to these films with a bit of bias. However, I wasn’t as rabid as some who were anti-the film before it even got made and especially when they heard there would be no Craven involvement and no Englund as Freddy. I can’t say I was happy about it being remade as I always expected it to be crap, but that idea of a demonic entity stalking kids in their sleep is still one I find intriguing – with the right script, director, cast, there’s nothing stopping it from being good.

As expected, it’s not good. Props to everyone for trying something sort of different, and props to Jackie Earle for giving it a go, but it just doesn’t work – not as a Nightmare film, and not as a horror film. It’s nowhere near as inventive as it should be and doesn’t offer anything in the way of creative kills or use of the dream ‘space’ imaginatively. The script isn’t horrid, it’s just bland and like any number of remakes it tries to delve more into the character of the killer unnecessarily. Listen – it doesn’t matter who or what Freddy is, or any other killer for that matter. It wants to kill you. It has killed already. What the fuck are you going to do about it – that’s your film, or at least it should be.

While watching the film at the time, I kept thinking that it wasn’t as bad as the reviews had suggested and I wasn’t going to stoop to the same level as those somehow suggesting it tarnished the original. That didn’t stop it from also committing those Cardinal Sins once more – any ‘fear’ I felt in this was likely more jittery excitement at the possibility of Freddy showing up to fuck shit up. It’s not quite boring, it just feels like yet another slasher whereas the original flipped the genre on its head. I can’t remember a single kill or piece of dialogue from this movie so it would otherwise go on the to be forgotten pile. Because it has the name it does, it instead makes it onto the disappointed pile, and onto this list.

Robin Hood

When I was typing up this list, all I could remember about the film was that Ridley Scott directed and Russel Crowe was in it. At some point since watching, this got confused in my head with King Arthur or whatever the hell that was called. It shouldn’t be difficult to be a Robin Hood movie – the story and characters and setting are all there, and it’s perfectly set up for adventure, romance, and an all round fun time. So why the hell, in the four or five versions we’ve had in the last twenty or so years has every single one got it so wrong? Prince Of Thieves is the definitive modern version, and while it’s far from perfect, it’s a hell of a lot of fun. This… this is something about beards? Men with beards? Someone dies and some other guy pretends to be him, and then it ends. Honestly, the day after seeing this I couldn’t have told you anything that had happened.

Scott Pilgrim Vs The World

I’m consistently bewildered by the love this film gets – popping up in many best of year and best of decade lists. I just don’t get it. It’s 100% hipster wank and feels like it was made by someone who has never played a videogame in their life. The Mario Bros movie is more authentic. It’s all so strange because I love everything else Edgar Wright has done. But it brings together a bunch of indie hipster performers and people I don’t generally rate to play 16 bit NPC-level humans cut in this generic music video style. There isn’t an ounce of originality in the script beyond the admittedly novel premise and I sat there watching it thinking ‘this is a seventy year old white guy’s idea of what a videogame looks like, after hearing about Pacman forty years earlier’. The fights, the stylized look, the colours, everything has been done better before and while it’s not the film’s fault, it pisses me off that people think this broke ground.

I don’t think I despised a movie more this decade to the point that even the clothes starting pissing me off. Honestly, I had a hard time finding a screenshot for the movie to include at the top of the post because looking at each one was making me more and more angry. But I wanted to feature that film as the featured image because I know how much everyone loves it – gotta get those clicks, bro!

Maybe it irked me so much because it’s so clearly aimed at someone like me, that it made me step back defensively and say ‘hold the fuck on – that’s what you think I am!? This is what the world sees me as!?’ It’s a film I should have loved, but it’s just an abhorrent shambles. Don’t get me started on the awful soundtrack either – if you have a film with performers as bland as Michael Cera, Anna Kendrick, and Jason Schwartzman, you just know the soundtrack is going to feature Beck. Throw in more failed Indie nobodies with less to say than Milli Vanilli and you have a film to watch the volume off.

After the first fight, you’ve seen all you need to. What the film doesn’t have the balls to say is that each and every character deserves to be pounded headfirst into a ? block before dropped down a pit with Game Over left on their blank tombstone.

Burlesque

Every so often, some wise-ass gets the great idea to bring the Musical back instead of letting it die and rot in the 1940s where it belongs. It’s a genre which simply doesn’t belong on screen anymore, unless you’re going to do something novel with it. Musicals on stage work – musicals on film don’t, and I can count the film musicals I tolerate (never mind enjoy) on one hand. Burlesque saw the bewildering success of Chicago and said ‘well, it’s been a few years, lets roll out the same shit again and see who falls for it this time’. It’s painful.

Once again in a musical we have a collection of songs that nobody who cares about music can honestly enjoy, once more it devolves into camp, and once more it delivers the promise of a story we’ve seen before played out by characters whose entire lives could fit under a child’s fingernail. When the primary purpose of your film is to showcase how well the human body can move in rhythmic time to a piece of music, you’ve failed as a film-maker. When the secondary purpose of your film is to show how well the human body looks in certain clothes, you have failed as a film-maker. While it should be fairly obvious that the Musical is not a genre I give two shits about, I can at least recognise when one is well-made versus one which isn’t. This is about as poor as the musical can get, with dialogue straight out of a instructional pamphlet written in Chinese and badly translated into English, and performances including Christina Aguilera’s – a wonderful showcase for her ability to wear make-up.

Chatroom

Hideo Nakata made one of my favourite movies of all time in Ringu. He has made some interesting films since then, none of which come remotely close to measuring up to that classic. Chatroom is a monstrosity arriving ten years too late and which seems even more outdated with each passing week. It’s a miracle that some of the cast members actually came out of this without the stench of shit following them. It makes next to no sense, it doesn’t understand its own script, and the actors seem to be in at least four different movies. How does the guy who did Ringu and Dark Water come out with something like this – a horror movie with zero attempt to build atmosphere and no scares? That’s an even bigger mystery than anything which happens in the film.

Rubber

Rubber makes my list, not only because it’s a bad film, but because it thinks it’s more clever than it is, and because a bunch of people fell for it. It’s a movie about a killer tyre – that’s more than enough to get me handing over my ill-gotten cash, and that’s what I want to see. Instead we get ham-fisted meta and everything trick employed to pad out the running time to ensure it’s not a short. If you’re a horror fan and you’ve heard someone talking about this movie – don’t waste your time with it – it’s not as good, or bad, or interesting as it sounds.

There you have it – some controversial choices to be sure. Let me feel your wrath in the comments, and feel free to share your most hated/least favourite films of 2010 below!

Nightman’s Favourite Films Of 2010

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Okay, okay. You asked for it, you get it. Maybe no-one asked for it, but tough – you’re getting it anyway. I mentioned before that from 2010 onward I haven’t seen as many movies as previous years and there hasn’t been as much time for them to sink in to my being to say I truly love them. What that means is that these lists will likely omit a lot of great films purely because I haven’t seen them yet, and it may feel more like a simple collection of films I just happen to have seen and didn’t hate. In ten years time I imagine these lists will be different, while my lists of previous decades will likely be identical. If you’re curious as to why I’ve missed something – stick it in the comments and I’ll let you know! I’m only posting 2010 for now, then I’ll go back and redo all the previous years before I publish 2011 onward.

First, the almosts – Predators. Animal Kingdom. Tomorrow When The World Began. Predators was, for me at least, the long awaited sequel. I love the Predator franchise more than most and I even enjoyed both AVP movies – rubbish as they were. Predator is a Top Ten all timer for me and Predator 2 is decent. Predators has a great opening and some strong set-pieces, along with a strong cast featuring Adrian Brody and Alice Braga. The whole Topher Grace thing was predictable and the Lawrence Fisbourne angle ultimately goes nowhere, but it’s a neat twist on the whole ‘group of strangers working together to overcome a mutual enemy’ thing. Animal Kingdom is a film deserving a spot on any Best Of 2010 list – a supremely acted and directed crime thriller, with Jacki Weaver well deserving of that Academy nomination. Tomorrow When The War Began keeps things in Australia – it’s very YA and while I enjoyed it more at first watch than I have since, it’s still a better version of Red Dawn than the Red Dawn remake was. Plus, I’ll take any excuse to see Caitlin Stasey on the big screen – still waiting for her to go over big time.

11: Inception

It’s not the masterpiece people say it is. It’s unquestionably a great movie, inventive, well acted, brilliantly crafted. But man does it go overboard on the exposition, and it thinks it’s smarter and more groundbreaking than it actually is. Mostly it feels like a cloying teacher’s pet begging for validation from teaching staff. It’s okay – we already understand you’re good, just do your thing and we’ll still enjoy it, stop being a tryhard. Still, it sells certain constructs and philosophies to the masses who may have not been aware of such things or does it in a non-stale way. More than any other movie Nolan had directed to that point, Inception does that strange thing where scenes are edited together without the soundtrack changing, making minutes upon minutes feel like one extended scene or a montage, even though it isn’t. But lets focus on the many positives – it has a number of the best set-piece scenes you’ll ever see which are almost on par with the first time you saw The Matrix, improved by the fact that the technology used enhances the idea of what is happening on screen – the effects are integral to the plot, not just a bunch of fancy explosions. The soundtrack is great, the script is peppered with one-liners, and it all looks glorious. Like many of the best films of all time – it’s the fans who piss me off and tarnish the experience.

10: Kick-ass

The highest profile of a number of movies which came out around this time with a similar premise – what if a regular person just decided to suit up and fight crime like a superhero? Super is the other notable one – it’s great fun too – but Kick-ass has the budget and street cred and a number of memorable performances. You have Nic Cage on top form, Mark Strong in yet another villainous role, but the breakout stars are Aaron Johnson and Chloe Grace Moretz as two (sort-of) normal people with a penchant for justice, however violent its pursuit may be. There is plenty of fun action and humour, with just a touch of the psychology behind the decisions each character makes, and the cocktail of style and violence is perfect – much better than that Scott Pilgrim mess.

9: The Expendables

Of course if you want violent action, you go back to the 80s Action heroes heyday. In 2010 a project which had been discussed for years, and which seemed an impossibility, finally came to fruition – a film which tried to squeeze all of the biggest action movie stars into a single story. That means we have Stallone, Schwarzenegger, Willis, Lundgren, Jet Li, Jason Statham all arsing about with guns larger than most people’s arms and blasting away bad guys inside a generic ‘stop the warlord’ plot. As you would expect, it’s a lot of fun. It’s silly, but the cast all have a great time and it’s a film made purely for the maniacs like me who grew up watching them. Of course it’s a pity some of the stars are reduced to cameos, but we get Terry Crewes and Randy Couture filling in admirably, Stone Cold as a henchman, Eric Roberts as Eric Roberts, and Mickey Rourke mumbling his way through an emotional macho speech. Plus Charisma Carpenter on the big screen. It would have been nice to have seen this ten years earlier – it would have been nice to have even more stars involved – it would have been nice to have a plot more in line with something like Predator than Raw Deal, but it still happened, they still made a franchise out of it, and it;s still a lot of fun.

8: Kaboom

I’ve been a Greg Araki fan ever since I first saw The Doom Generation in my late teens. Its mix of sex, violence, humour, and post Pulp Fiction style was infused with a manic nihilism and tongue in cheek awareness that felt unlike anything else. Naturally, nobody else had heard of it and few even now know what it is. Since then he followed it up with further well-received, under-seen films with big name actors. Kaboom takes the manic qualities of The Doom Generation and ramps them up tenfold. It’s lighter in tone, more obviously a comedy, yet also a sex-filled jaunt into Science Fiction. It’s bizarre and it has a terrific ending. It’s a difficult one to summarize – it follows a University student who appears to be bisexual who has been having strange dreams which suggest he is ‘the chosen one’. We follow his sexual antics (and those of his friends) and he keeps noticing people he first saw in his dreams, in his everyday life. Plot-wise, that’s really all you need to know. But the movie moves like it’s on a combo of Ecstasy and Speed, Dekker is great in the lead role, and Juno Temple delivers the sort of performance which is deserving of an Oscar nod. It’s never going to happen for a film like this, but it put her on the map.

7: Tangled

It’s Disney’s Rapunzel. At this point it is still overshadowed by Frozen and the more ‘political’ Pixar movies, but it’s just as wonderful as those. Great songs, strong characters, lots of laughs, and a charming story – everything you want from Disney.

6: Ip Man 2

Most sequels tend to be an example of diminishing returns and the same is often more true in Martial Arts. With Ip Man 2 we get everything we loved in the original and more; more fights, more emotion, more Yen. Keeping the same cast and director as the first film it follows Ip Man as he moves to Hong Kong and sets up a new school. Sammo Hung shows up. It’s wonderful. It eschews the nonsensical fraud editing of Hollywood action and allows the camera to catch every movement of every fight, making it all the more breathtaking. It still looks glorious with a gorgeous vision of period Hong Kong and a dedicated attention to detail. For fans of Martial Arts movies, the Ip Man series is like the Holy Grail, and part 2 may be the best of the bunch.

5: The Last Exorcism

I believe I mentioned this in my review of the film many years ago, but it deserves to be said again; Ashley Bell deserved an Oscar nomination for her performance here, if not the win. She is extraordinary, easily on a par with some of the more critically popular horror performances – Kathy Bates, Toni Colette, Jodie Foster. Unfortunately the film is of a trashier, cheaper sort than others and The Academy believes it to be above such things. It’s a found footage horror movie about a charlatan exorcist who lost his faith and admits to making up most of what he previously called out as true exorcisms. He is invited to perform an exorcism on a naive teenage girl in the Bible Belt, and a film crew tag along. It is clear some sort of abuse has been taking place, but the group argues over whether it is from Nell’s father, friends, someone else inside the community,  or a genuine demon.

The film would not be as effective without Bell as Nell, but she is backed up by dedicated performances from Patrick Fabian, Caleb Landrey Jones, and Louis Herthum. Credit goes to Daniel Stamm, someone who remains little known even in horror circles, who elevates te least likely sub-genre.

4: Bedevilled

As I write up this list (29th December 2019), South Korea’s Parasite is gaining momentum as a possible Oscar Contender. In my introductions to Foreign Cinema series, I mention (in one unpublished post) that one of the great crimes and complete nonsenses is that South Korea has not even been nominated for a single Oscar before. That is quite frankly ludicrous, given the quality of output the country has been producing since 2000. If there is one thing which probably puts off the stuffy Hollywood Academy types, it’s the grim and macabre nature of the most highly regarded films, films which don’t shy away from showing violence, or sex, or the taboo. Bedevilled ticks all of these boxes and is one of the finest all round movies of the decade, yet is one which remains little known even among those who frequently dine out on Asian Cinema.

It’s a film that I would love to be widely seen almost purely to see the thoughts on any feminism and masochism which people will take from it. It’s a film concerning a woman who works in a competitive banking environment who decides to go on stress leave, taking up an offer from an old friend to visit the backwater island she grew up in. Once there, memories of her childhood and her friendships come back, and she recalls why she left the regressive, male-dominant, outsider-fearing community. Her friend has never left the island and wants a better life for her and her young daughter. To say any more would be spoiler territory.

There is a slow and steady assured direction to the film, a washed out palette, and some moments which will have you groaning in anger and shifting uncomfortably. It’s not as violent as other films of the ilk, but it’s just as shocking and pulverizing to your emotions. It probes your own morality and begs you to question how you would or could react and survive given your decisions. It’s a watch both difficult and effortless.

3: Stake Land

How many truly great vampire movies are there? There are hundreds of good ones, and many more which are entertaining and worth your time, but only a small number can be held up as great films. Stake Land should be added to that list, though it never will be, at least not until director Jim Mickle makes something which is both a widespread critical and commercial success. He has come close a few times and continues to make highly regarded films. Stake Land, while clearly appealing mostly to horror fans, remains criminally underseen even within that group. For those looking for a dark drama, there is more than enough here to seduce and provoke – for my money it’s better than The Road – a film it is often compared to.

It’s set in a post-apocalyptic USA where survivors must avoid rapists and religious cultists by day, and vampires by night. We follow Mister (Nick Damici), a vampire hunter of sorts as he takes a teenage orphan called Martin (Connor Paolo) towards a supposed last protected zone. Along the way they pick up a Nun (Kelly McGillis), a pregnant woman (Danielle Harris), and a marine (Sean Nelson) who was rescued by the cult who wanted to sacrifice him. The film moves from threat to threat with plenty of introspective chat and bleakly stunning views of a collapsed world. It’s not a pleasant, happy viewing experience – there are precious view jokes or moments of hope, but it’s never less than completely engrossing and you never feel like any character is safe. Like The Road, the film is interspersed with rapid bouts of violence – cultists dropping vampires into a survivor camp is of particular note. The sequel is worth your time too, but the original is best survived by watching the associated webisode prequel shorts.

2: Paranormal Activity 2

I said it at the time, and while I admit to it probably not being a true statement, I still kind of feel the same way – it’s the greatest horror sequel of all time. Of course, if you didn’t like the first film, you probably won’t like this one either. If you did enjoy the first, if the found footage shtick and use of shaky cam didn’t piss you off, and if the long moments of quiet followed by a thumping boom jump scare hadn’t yet been watered down to irrelevance for you, then PA2 does everything the first one does – but better. Better scares, a better story (one which expands the universe and mythology), and it is better directed. Most crucially, the characters are more likable, grounded, and not the nonsensical yuppies of the first. In fact, as the movies begin to cross over at different points, this one makes the lead characters in part one more likable – at the very least more interesting.

The film is most similar to Evil Dead 2 in its approach; it’s basically a remake, but also acts as a sequel. Not to confuse things, but it’s also a prequel. The film takes place over a number of weeks and follows the Rey family, with mother Kristi the younger sister of the first film’s Katie. The family have a new security system installed in the opening minutes due to a perceived burglary – you know what that means – beeping doors and subtly placed cameras! The family has an infant son – Hunter – and we watch their daily, and nightly, business as creepy activity increases, seemingly centered on the child. At various points the film crosses over with the first as we catch up on Katie and Micah as they too begin to experience unusual capering in their house.

While I’m not a fan of jumpscares – mainly because they are used so cheaply – that’s not the case here. Sure you know they’re coming, but the fun is in trying to work out which room something is going to happen in, which camera is going to catch a subtle movement, how long drawn out is the tension going to be? I’ve mentioned this before too, but seeing this in a Cinema was one of my best Cinema experiences as the audience was All In – people were legit screaming their heads off, shouting at the characters, and you could feel the held intakes of breath as people waited for the next fright. That just doesn’t happen in Northern Ireland cinemas and is the closest experience to to any time I’ve been in the Cinema in the US. While I admit it enhanced my love and nostalgia for the film – I would have loved it had I been there by myself. Some of the scares are completely out of the blue and the ones which are a retread of those from the first are dialed up several notches – greater impact, more visceral, more effective.

1: I Saw The Devil

South Korea strikes again. While Japan started out the 2000s as the biggest and brightest light in Asian Cinema, South Korea picked things up in the second half of the decade and that has obviously continued into the 2010s. Two of Kim Ji Woon’s previous efforts – A Tale Of Two Sisters and A Bittersweet Life are essentially flawless, beautiful, grim, stylish, and provocative in equal measures. With I Saw The Devil he embraces the grim and dispenses with beauty. It’s a singular viewing experience, with few easy answers, but many moments which will sit with you for years afterwards.

The film is essentially a game of cat and mouse between a cop and a killer, with escalating tension and violence. The killer, played by Oldboy’s Choi Min-Sik is utterly, thoroughly unlikable. Yet he is the mouse and by proxy, traditionally, the person the audience is supposed to sympathize with. Throughout the film he is stalked by the cop, played by A Bittersweet Life’s Lee Byung-hun. The killer brutally murders the cop’s pregnant wife in the opening moments and the cop, with nothing left to lose, becomes the killer, hunting down Sik and repeatedly beating him to a pulp, only to leave him dangling as a cat would, then hunt him down again. It’s a film concerned equally with blurring lines as it is with showcasing the director’s penchant for nihilism and inflicting pain. Both lead performers are superb, surpassing most of their prior achievements, and what they go through is keenly felt by the viewer. While the violence and tone is grisly, it is offset by just how well it is all put together, and the genuine emotional trip we are put through. There’s a fight scene inside a taxi which beggars belief, and there are a variety of side-characters and sojourns into their depraved lives which extends the running time and complicates the narrative, but it all makes up for the most devastating experience since Martyrs. There’s simply no excuse for this not to have been on the Oscar list for 2010, even if it was a particularly strong year. More importantly, there’s absolutely no excuse for this not be on your list of must see films right now.

Let us know in the comments what you think of the movies above, and feel free to share your Top Ten!