Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1975

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Nashville (US)

9: Barry Lyndon (UK/US)

8: Picnic At Hanging Rock (OZ)

7: Hard Times (US)

6: Deep Red (Italy)

5: The Land That Time Forgot (UK/US)

4: Monty Python And The Holy Grail (UK)

3: Dog Day Afternoon (US)

2: One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (US)

1: Jaws (US)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three (including the top grossing)

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Five (including the winner)

Don’t forget to tune in on Thursday for my favourite films of 1976!

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Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1973

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Badlands (US)

9: Robin Hood (US)

8: High Plains Drifter (US)

7: Mean Streets (US)

6: Serpico (US)

5: Don’t Look Now (UK/Italy)

4: The Wicker Man (UK)

3: The Exorcist (US)

2: Enter The Dragon (HK/US)

1: Live And Let Die (UK)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: One

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1972

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Silent Running (US)

9: Last Tango In Paris (France/Italy)

8: The Getaway (US)

7: Asylum (UK)

6: Deliverance (US)

5: Game Of Death (HK)

4: The Last House On The Left (US)

3: Fist Of Fury (HK)

2: Way Of The Dragon (HK)

1: The Godfather (US)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three (including the top grossing)

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Two (including the winner)

Tune in on Tuesday for my favourite films of 1973, and don’t forget to check out my more in depth choices by decade!

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1971

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Vanishing Point (USA)

9: McCabe And Mrs Miller (USA)

8: Walkabout (UK/OZ)

7: Straw Dogs (US/UK)

6: The French Connection (USA)

5: Get Carter (UK)

4: Dirty Harry (USA)

3: Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory (USA)

2: The Big Boss (HK/Thailand)

1: A Clockwork Orange (USA/UK)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Two (Including the winner)

Don’t forget, my favourite films of 1972 will be coming on Thursday!

Nightman’s Top Ten Films Of 1970

Greetings, Glancers! We continue my new series of posts which will detail my favourite films of every year since 1950. Why 1950? Why 10? Why anything? Check out my original post here. As with most of these lists the numbering doesn’t really matter much, though in most cases the Number 1 will be my clear favourite. As I know there are plenty of Stats Nerds out there, I’ll add in some bonus crap at the bottom but the main purpose of these posts is to keep things short. So!

10: Woodstock (USA)

9: Zabriskie Point (USA)

8: MASH (USA)

7: Brewster McCloud (USA)

6: The Conformist (Italy/France/Germany)

5: Joe (USA)

4: The Bird With The Crystal Plumage (Italy/Germany)

3: Patton (USA)

2: Five Easy Pieces (USA)

1: Kelly’s Heroes (USA)

How Many Of My Films Were In The Top 10 Grossing Of The Year: Three

How Many Of My Films Were Nominated For the Best Picture Oscar: Three (Including the winner)

Nightman’s Top Films Of The 1960s – Stats Roundup

Greetings, Glancers! So, older readers of my Oscars posts may recall that I tried to give some stats at the end of the year. It became too difficult to gather metrics and I become too lazy, and lo the posts migrated to the Hades Of Blogs like so many before. The same will likely happen to these summary posts – where I give some ‘interesting’ stats on my favourite films of each decade. It doesn’t mean anything, you won’t gain any insight or pleasure from reading them, and they will be painful to write. Why do it? Well shucks, I’ve always had a thing for hurting myself. ‘Enjoy’!

Number Of Best Picture Nominees: Eighteen (Out of a possible fifty)

Number Of Best Picture Winners: Three (Out of a possible ten)

Number Of Movies In The Top Ten Grossing of The Year: Thirty Six (Out of a possible one hundred)

Number Of Movies Which Were The Top Grosser: Three (Out of a possible ten)

The number of films nominated for Best Picture this year dropped marginally, while my numbers of Best Picture Winner picks went from 6 to three – ostensibly this tells me that I rarely agreed with the Academy choices throughout the decade. On the flip side, the number of Movies in the Top Ten Grossing list increased by fourteen, showing that maybe I was following the crowd and enjoying the mass market movies rather than the critical darlings, although the actual Top Grossing Movie picks went down to three from six. It’s likely a case of me seeing more movies from this decade than the one before, and preferring plenty of movies which were not eligible,were foreign, or were cult classics rather than hits.

Movies By Country In My Top 10:

USA: Fifty Nine

UK: Thirty Two

Italy: Eleven

Japan: Five

France: Five

Germany: Four

Spain: Four

Algeria: One

The USA dominates again, though this being the swinging 60s, the UK figures are probably the best they will ever be. Due to this, the US figures have taken a dip, but the slack has been picked up by Italy who rack up (legs) eleven hits. Again, I imagine that will be the best tally the country will garner in a single decade. Sweden and Canada drop off the list, and Algeria joins.

Movies By Director:

Stanley Kubrick: Four

Robert Aldrich: Four

Sergio Leone: Four

Terence Young: Four

Disney (yeah I know): Three

Roman Polanski: Three

 

Federico Fellini: Two

Blake Edwards: Two

Stanley Kramer: Two

Akira Kurosawa: Two

Alfred Hitchcock: Two

John Sturges: Two

Sidney J Furie: Two

J. Lee Thompson: Two

Norman Jewison: Two

Mike Nichols: Two

Don Chaffey: Two

Lewis Gilbert: Two

Gerald Thomas: Two

 

Jean Luc Godard: One

Mark Robson: One

Masaki Kobayashi: One

Cy Endfield: One

Terence Fisher: One

Arthur Penn: One

Gillo Pontecorvo: One

Peter Yates: One

Sam Peckinpah: One

George Roy Hill: One

Peter R Hunt: One

Peter Collinson: One

Guy Hamilton: One

Robert Rossen: One

Jack Clayton: One

Franklin J Schaffner: One

John Schlesinger: One

Mel Brooks: One

Lindsey Anderson: One

John Boorman: One

Roger Vadim: One

Michael Powell: One

Wolf Rilla: One

Georges Franju: One

Billy Wilder: One

Nobuo Nakagawa: One

Jean Luc Godard: One

Val Guest: One

Marlon Brando: One

Vittorio De Sica: One

Hiroshi Teshigahara: One

Michaelangelo Antonioni: One

Richard Brooks: One

James Hill: One

Dennis Hopper: One

Russ Meyer: One

George A Romero: One

Paul Bogart: One

Guy Green: One

Richard Lester: One

Bryan Forbes: One

Stuart Rosenberg: One

Ken Annakin: One

Andrew Marton: One

Bernhard Wicki: One

Gerd Oswald: One

Darryl F Zanuck: One

John Ford: One

David Lean: One

Robert Mulligan: One

Herk Harvey: One

Francis Ford Coppola: One

Luchino Visconti: One

Sydney: Pollack: One

Jospeh L Mankiewicz: One

Robert Wise: One

One hundred films, seventy five directors. We have some new directors making my stats this decade, while some of the big hitters from the 1950s have dropped back or dropped off completely. Elia Kazan is gone after notching up multiple entries last time around, while both Hitchcock and Kurosawa drop down to two. Kazan made eight films in the 50s, but only four in the sixties, while Hitchcock and Kurosawa similarly eased their output. That means we have no clear front-runners for the 1960s – instead, we have a quartet of quartets, with Kubrick, Young, Leone, and Aldrich earning top honours and Disney and Polanski close behind.

Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

Nightman’s Top Films Of The 1960s

I continue my summary of my favourite films by year and by decade with this, my favourite films of the 1960s.

10: Yojimbo (Japan 1961)

While Kurosawa and Hitchcock dominated my favourites of the 1950s, the two directors feature less here. This is another Kurosawa answer to a Western favourite, which would again be borrowed and remade in America. Toshiro Mifune is awesome (of course) as a Samurai who decides to pit the two warring sides of a small town against each other for his own gains. There are epic one liners, visuals, and the odd spot of action to keep even the most vocal foreign movie detractor happy.

9: The Jungle Book (Disney 1967)

People of my generation, growing up in the 80s and 90s, saw this on a yearly basis during childhood. I’m not sure why, but it always seemed to be there. It’s still one of the most satisfying and purely entertaining Disney movies – for us boys there was none of that romantic nonsense, just arsing about in the jungle with animals. Great songs, plenty of laughs, and many memorable characters make this one of the best Disney films ever.

8: The Birds (1963, USA)

Hitchcock’s final huge hit, and another departure for the director who spent most of the decade moving away from the sort of films he used to make. This is one of the few with a female protagonist/antagonist as we follow Tippi Hedren to Bodega Bay for the sake of some foreplay pranking. It isn’t long before things get weird, with minor bird attacks becoming widespread, massive, and terrifying. I love every performance here, and I love how almost nothing is explained, unlike most Hitchcock films. Sometimes birds just shit on you for no reason – other times they go for the throat.

7: Psycho (USA, 1960)

Hitchcock brought the horror film kicking and screaming into the modern world with Psycho. No longer was it ghosts or other worldly creatures to fear, but it was a friendly, helpful face – a neighbour, or someone you may have known your entire life. Decades ahead of its time from a technical and thematic standpoint, Psycho was not only a revelation upon release but remains shocking in today’s world of blank faces and faux reactions. If you’re reading this post then you’ve already seen the movie – it spawned a bunch of sequels and a pretty decent TV prequel series, and it has been parodied perhaps more than any other single horror film. Even with all of that, it can still be watched and enjoyed for its many merits.

6: Jason And The Argonauts (USA/UK, 1963)

Probably the only film on my list that purists will sneer at, and that’s fine – it’s a personal list. I’ve wrote about it before, but I’ve always loved myths and legends. Those are what probably got me into reading and writing, and from an early age I was obsessed with the adventures, the heroes, the quests, and monsters. When I wrote stories in school I would borrow plots, places, and character names from these stories. I studied Latin in school for seven years because of this. I did a year of Classical Studies at University because of this. I still say the perfect Greek Legend movie has yet to be made, but when I was young films such as Jason And The Argonauts were eye-opening – someone else clearly shared my obsession and wanted to see the stories put on film. This has it all for me – the adventure, the story about fulfilling one’s destiny and making a perilous journey, the disparate characters thrown together in vignettes – all those things which also made me first enjoy film as a form.

5: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly (Italy/Germany/Spain/US, 1966)

The pinnacle of the Western and it’s not even a ‘true Western’. When I was young I was not a fan of Western movies. If I wanted action I would turn to Arnie, and if I wanted nice shots of wide expanses I would look out my window. It was Spaghetti Westerns which changed my mind – they seemed more realistic, they had more violence, and things were less black and white. When you grow up in a war zone of sorts you either join a side or you get sick of the whole thing and realize that there are no sides – only death. The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly has sides, but it has layers and blurring boundaries. It also has one of the best scores ever, it also looks spectacular, and it has three of cinema’s best bad-asses being bad ass.

4: The Great Escape (USA, 1963)

I don’t really know how this is viewed in America, but in Britain watching this is a tradition. Everything about this film is perfect – score, cast, story. The first time I watched this, it was probably one of the oldest and longest films I had chosen to sit down and get through. It zipped by and each time I watch it, it never seems to get any older or slower. Again, if you’re here you know the story – a bunch of Allied Troops in a German POW camp decide to escape – that’s it. Again you have the assembly of characters introduced in near vignette style, each with their own particular skill or use, and the whole film builds up to (insert title here) where the troops make a break for freedom. It’s wonderful how it all builds, and how the last thirty minutes show the various groups and individuals outside the camp trying to evade capture. Probably my favourite War film ever.

3: The Magnificent Seven (USA, 1960)

I mentioned above how I never really liked Westerns when I was young. This is my favourite Western of all time, and really pulled me towards the genre. In many ways it’s one of the films which made me interested in ‘older’ movies. When I was younger – and I mean my early teens or before – I didn’t pay much attention to films which were made before I was born. There were exceptions of course, Star Wars, Jaws, The Bond Series, and Martial Arts movies. The Magnificent Seven was one of the first gateway films for me – a film made twenty three years before I was born that had more bad-ass moments and characters than a hundred other movies combined. Again as I’ve stated before, this film perfects the whole assorted group of characters introduced in vignette style, coming together for a shared purpose. That purpose is basically a suicide mission – protecting a group of poor and elderly farmers from a group of violent schemers led by the great Eli Wallach. What’s not to like? Steve McQueen, Yul Brynner, Charles Bronson, a terrific Bernstein score, laughs, action, one-liners, even a tacked on romantic sub-plot. It’s fantastic, and another one of those films which never fails to entertain and that you can enjoy from any point of its running time if you happen upon it while channel hopping.

2: You Only Live Twice (UK, 1967)

My favourite Connery Bond movie, by quite some distance, and one of my top five favourite Bond films, You Only Live Twice is a lot more fun than most of the early outings. It ticked a lot of boxes for me when I was young – Japan, Ninjas, secret bases, epic fights and stunts, dogfights, piranha death, and more. It’s maybe the first instance of showing Bond in a tragic light – he gets married and his wife is promptly killed, something which would become commonplace in the series, and even though it’s a sham wedding it reinforces the fact that this is a solo, solitary life of little more than constant sacrifice and danger. This has some of the best sets in the series and many of my favourite moments.

1: The Night Of The Living Dead (1968, USA)

What else can I say about the best horror movie of the decade, and one of the best ever? Would I like there to have been a bigger budget, perhaps bigger actors? I don’t think so – it’s perfect as it is, and just as chilling as it ever was. This is where it all began. A brother and sister are visiting a graveyard apparently situated some distance from the nearest large town. Within moments they are attacked randomly, with one seemingly being killed and the other escaping to a nearby farmhouse. From there, the horror truly begins as reports of the dead coming back to life and attacking the living emerge and a group of assorted survivors converge in the house and try to survive the night. Just like real life, opinions differ, tempers flare, and… well, if you haven’t seen it I’ll just let you experience it for yourself. This is horror, this is is film at its most relevant, potent, filmmaking at its most raw and honest, and an absolute must for anyone calling themselves a film fan.

Let us know in the comments what your favourite films of the 1960s are – do you have any hidden gems or do you stick to the mainstream? How many films are a product of Hollywood, or do you have any non-US entries?