Little Baby Nothing

Generic Ratings: 1: Crap. 2: Okay. 3: Good. 4: Great

The band may have been seen as cross-dressing, eye-liner and lipstick wearing freaks in their early days, spouting political sleaze and dirty little punk songs, but it wasn’t until Little Baby Nothing that many of the reasons behind the sleaze and the look became clear. This was a feminist band, almost in militant fashion, not a band who simply dressed that way because they were hot enough to pull it off, not simply espousing and waxing lyrical on the struggles of women due to some designed outsider chic. This was a band who thoroughly despised male dominated culture and called it out for the systematic destruction and whoring of species that it was. Musically and lyrically one of the finest, and most pure in terms of its targeting from any Manics album, it’s clearly a high mark.

The band’s first duet, bringing on board ex Porn Star Traci Lords (after they couldn’t get Kylie Minogue) to perform vocal duties, the lyrics are poignant and potent and merge perfectly with the glossy 80s sheen of the sound. Bradfield tugs at all the strings with his performance, the melodies are gold throughout, and I adore the shift from the verse and chorus to the final section. It certainly comes across as cheesy in its sound now, but it doesn’t take long to look past that to find the honesty of the intent and the power of the music. For my money, it’s also (easily) the best video the band has ever made.

Misheard Lyrics (it feels somehow wrong doing this to what is one of the most gorgeous lyrics of all time, but there you go):

  1. Not allowed to connect you
  2. To steal frequent love
  3. Need to do long (?)
  4. Orderly behind his money
  5. Asking for condolerijusive (??) flowers
  6. Loveless labour
  7. Dress your life in loving
  8. Breaking your mind with Bobby Dom fertility (?)
  9. Mouths broken up, quenched to the last

Actual Lyrics:

  1. No-one likes looking at you
  2. To steal vacant love
  3. Need to belong
  4. All they leave behind is money
  5. Eyes, skin, bone, contour, language as a flower
  6. Loveless slavery
  7. Dress your life in loathing
  8. Breaking your mind with Barbie Doll futility
  9. Moths broken up, quenched at last

Little Baby Nothing: 4/Great (Album version)

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Slash N’ Burn

Generic Ratings: 1. Crap. 2: Ok. 3: Good. 4: Great

I can’t remember precisely the order in which I bought the Manics albums, but I have a strong feeling that Generation Terrorists was second after Everything Must Go. I do remember being surprised by its heaviness and rockness thanks to the opening moments of Slash ‘n’ Burn, which means I must have only been used to their EMG era sound. The song opens with a terrific muted riff which is then repeated at a more blaring volume before the drums and vocals kick in. Hello slogans, hello young Bradfield vocals. I still find it strange that this one was ever released as a single, but I suppose it was punchy and lyrical enough to grow interest in the band.

The opening track of the band’s first album sets the tone for the mammoth beast. Musically it’s an aggressive rock attack fused with punk pacing and layering riffs – we know from the outset that here is a band which knows how to play with the big boys, and are tipping their hats to the likes of G’n’R. James yells and howls and even does a funny little Axl Rose style orgasmic shriek at one point which you should always make sure to cough over any time you’re playing the song to someone else – it’s strictly for existing fans to appreciate.

The opening riff is great stuff, the rest of the song is standard rock stuff following a generic verse chorus format, but it’s the outlandish passion and lyrics which make the most impact, with the band covering a number of topics and making a comparison between US military strategy in Vietnam (wiping out swathes of land so nothing can live or grow) and British self-obsessed consumerist culture where we will do anything as long as someone famous says it’s okay too.

Misheard Lyric: Politics of defence got a C4 sense.

Actual Lyric: Politic’s her is death and God is safer sex.

Slash N Burn: 2/Okay

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An Introduction

Generation Terrorists was released in a storm of publicity. With an Us Against Them attitude, it was a full blown, over the top epic meant to symbolize everything the band stood for. They were the only British band playing this style of music, metal stadium rock guitars, spit polished glamour and political rhetoric all vomitted forth with anger and energy. The band dreamt that it would be a Appetite For Destruction style monster, shaking up the dreadful music scene before they disbanded and vanished forever.  The dream was never fulfilled and the band had to trawl through another 3 albums before getting the recognition they deserved. Looking back it is flawed, but packed with glorious moments; Overall it is the eternal symbol of youth, of fighting against the odds and surviving, of playing loud fast, clever music and still looking sexy through your exhaustion afterwards.