Best Animated Feature – 1971

My Nominations: Animal Treasure Island. Daisy Town. Shinbone Alley.

Bedknobs and Broomsticks was released in 1971, but it’s a live action movie with some animation. And it’s crap. So don’t complain if it isn’t here. That’s okay, because most of the nominations here are crap too and don’t really belong on the list. There wasn’t anything else though.

My Winner: Animal Treasure Island

anim.jpg

Let us know in the comments what your favourite animated movie of 1971 is!

Advertisements

Best Animated Feature – 1970

My Nominations: The Aristocats. 30,000 Miles Under the Sea. The Phantom Toll Booth

In the seventies we were still so ‘early’ in the lifecycle of animated movies that Disney essential owned the market. As the decade progressed, Japan would see increased output of increasing quality and a few more companies would begin to emerge. MGM’s The Phantom Tollbooth has a 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes but was not a success and MGM’s animation studio closed soon after. I prefer this to the similar (in style) Bedknobs and Broomsticks. 30,000 Miles Under The Sea is another early Toei Animation fantasy with plenty of action, but I think we all know what the winner here will be. The Aristocats is a minor Disney movie though fairly unique with its animal characters and musical approach.

My Winner: The Aristocats.

arist.jpg

Let us know in the comments which animated feature of 1970 you would pick as winner!

Best Animated Film – 1969

My Nominations: A Boy Named Charlie Brown. Tintin And The Temple Of The Sun. The Wonderful World Of Puss n Boots

I was never a fan of Tintin – something about the hair, the way the characters moved, and the animation as a whole just made me uneasy. So Temple Of The Sun, you’re out. The Wonderful World Of Puss In Boots is one of Toei Animation’s most iconic films as Puss (or Pero) went on to become the company’s mascot. The film is a mixture of fast paced action and slapstick humour, the odd song, and bright animation – any fans of Japanese animation need to see it. My winner though is of course, A Boy Named Charlie Brown. While not as famous as his festive outing, this one still has the laconic charm and mixture of downbeat cynicism and offbeat humour as Charlie enters spelling bees to convince himself that he can be ‘a winner’.

My Winner: A Boy Named Charlie Brown

film__9686-a-boy-named-charlie-brown--detail.jpg

Let us know in the comments which Animated movie of 1969 gets your vote as the best!

Best Animated Feature – 1968

My Nominations: Asterix and Cleopatra. The Little Norse Prince. The SuperVIPs. Yellow Submarine.

Asterix and Cleopatra is a surprisingly deep film with a lot of character and pot detail as well as some well drawn action sequences and musical numbers. The Super VIPs is a great little movie, well ahead of its time, charting the adventures of two superheroes – one a muscle bound freak, the other a stunted little man. It has a lot of humour which adults and kids alike will appreciate, making it look like a precursor to modern animated movies. Yellow Submarine is a bit of an illogical mess, but thanks to great artwork and (of course) music, it has a very unique style. The Little Norse Prince is one of the first Toei animated films I ever saw, pitting both Miyazaki and Takahata together and showcasing their flair for fast paced action, involving stories and characters, and fine animation which was beginning to move away from the Disney style to create a true, high quality competitor.

My Winner: The Little Norse Prince

h25.jpg

Which animated movie of 1968 do you think deserves the win? Let us know in the comments!

Best Animated Picture – 1967

My Nominations: Asterix The Gaul. Mad Monster Party. Jack And The Witch. The Jungle Book.

Even though there was no Animated Picture category this year, there are a number of notable films worthy of nomination. France’s most famous animated export Asterix makes his film debut. A decent film with all of the humourous traits of the comic even though I’ve never been much of a fan of the series. More interesting is Mad Monster Party, a films which deserves wider recognition and is perfect for younger viewers at Halloween. Even though the animation is dated, unsurprisingly, the script is strong, the songs are enjoyable, and the voice acting superb, from the likes of Boris Karloff and Phyllis Diller. Toei Animation’s Jack And The Witch is another great entry from Japan – a zany, dark tale of a strange car racing, animal befriending boy who has to take down an evil witch Queen who kidnaps and transforms children into monsters.

My winner though, is yet another Disney feature, and one of my all time favourites. The Jungle Book is at once the archetypal Disney film, and one of the most unusual – we have beautiful animation, humour, poignancy, vibrant memorable characters, and wonderful songs. On the flip side, there isn’t a Princess or a love story in sight, the setting is unique (or at least it was for the time), and an ending which is not as obvious a ‘happy ending’ as we may be used to. With tonnes of hilarious moments which still make me chuckle – King Louis chumping over his own arms, Baloo deafening Baghera, the John, Paul, Ringo, George vultures etc etc. The last film Disney worked on himself before his death in 1966, it was also arguably the final great film from the company before their early 90s return to glory.

My Winner: The Jungle Book

Article Lead - wide980268121md317image.related.articleLeadwide.729x410.1md1z0.png1428365259547.jpg-620x349.jpg

Let me know in the comments what your favourite Animated Film of 1967 is!

Best Animated Film – 1966

My Nominations: The Man Called Flintstone

There were plenty of animated shorts this year as you would expect, and a few films blending animation and live action which I tend to not count here. The only true animated film from this year that I’ve seen is my default winner, and luckily it’s not too bad. I’ve never been a huge Flintstones fan, although I watched the show when I was younger even then it felt a little before my time. The film is a bit of a mish mash of ideas from the show while lampooning other movies and featuring the usual light-hearted satire on American values. There are a few decent songs and the animation is exactly a  you remember it with that unique Hanna Barbera style.

10261200_1

My Winner: The Man Called Flintstone

Have you seen this one? Did you watch The Flintstones when you were younger? Let us know in the comments!

Best Animated Film: 1965

My Nominations: Gulliver’s Travels Beyond The Moon. Pinocchio In Outer Space. The Man From Button Willow. West And Soda.

Four bizarre nominations from me this year, covering Japan, Belgium, US, and Italy. Gulliver’s Travels was one of the first attempts at a Disney style film from Japanese giants Toei. It is interesting to see an early Japanese animation which retains the nation’s unique style but attempts to tell a Western story in a typically American way. West And Soda is an entertaining animated spaghetti Western which doesn’t take itself very seriously and pokes fun at the genre, both the Italian and American Western. Button Willow is another Western, though this time from the US and telling the story of Justin Eagle. It’s a little bare, and while the songs are entertaining enough, it’s easily forgettable. Pinocchio In Outer Space sounds exactly as you would expect, with typically 60s Martian interaction, and typically bizarre moon sized whales flying about…

My Winner: West And Soda

What is your favourite Animated film of 1965? Let us know in the comments section.