Best Foreign Film – 1966

Official Nominations: A Man And A Woman. The Battle Of Algiers. Loves Of A Blonde. Pharoah. Three

It’s another stellar war for World Cinema in the 60s, with at least three all-time classics in the official nominations and with Europe taking all the positions. A Man And A Woman was the official winner, Claude Lelouche’s tender romance drama captivating audiences with its acting and imagery. On the complete flip-side, Gillo Pontecorvo’s The Battle Of Algiers  is grimy, gritty, but shot in an equally stunning style, using locals rather than trained actors and shot in a modern-documentary style, portraying conflict as bloodying the hands of all who take part. Milos Foreman’s Loves Of A Blonde is significant as the Director’s first film, but stands on its own as an interesting, frank take on aimless love and crumbling society. The two remaining nominees are of a lesser pedigree, but interesting nonetheless – Aleksandar Petrovic’s Three is a peculiarly affecting look at death in three forms, while Jerzy Kawalerowicz’s Pharoah is a decent mini epic on the life of Ramses XIII.

My Winner: The  Battle Of Algiers

BATTLE OF ALGIERS, THE / BATTAGLIA DI ALGERI, LA

My Nominations: The  Battle Of Algiers. A Man And A Woman. Blow Up. Farenheit 451. The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly. Masculine-Feminine. Persona. The Sword Of Doom. Is Paris Burning?

As I mentioned earlier, this was a magnificent year for world cinema, and many greats were ‘snubbed’ – England/Italy’s Blow Up, France’s Farenheit 451, Is Paris Burning, and Masculine-Feminine, Sweden’s Persona, and Japan’s The Sword Of Doom veer between classic and cult gem. Towering above them all is The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly. I’ve spoken about a few of these already in the Best Picture category, so moving on to Godard’s Masculine-Feminine – it is another seminal piece of 60s French Cinema, famous for its explicit nature, unusual structure, and pop-culture dedication. Is Paris Burning is arguably France’s greatest WWII epic, with a terrific ensemble cast and gorgeous black and white cinematography. Keeping with B and W of course is Bergman, and with Persona he crafts another controversial piece – largely a series of monologues and conversation between two women, interjected with dreamlike imagery. Finally, Kihachi Okamoto’s The Sword Of Doom is one of the more brutal Jidaigeki films whose protagonist is wholly unlikable, selfish, yet engaging as we follow him from one murderous encounter to the next.

My Winner: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly

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What is your choice as the Best Foreign Film of 1966? Remember, under my rules this doesn’t have to be a film which is not in the English Language, but simply a film made outside of the US. Let us know in the comments!

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2 thoughts on “Best Foreign Film – 1966

  1. John Charet February 23, 2016 / 12:37 am

    So many great Foreign films to choose from, but I had to only go with one, I would pick Persona 🙂 Nevertheless, I love of all of your nominees and it is great to see a Jean-Luc Godard film on there 🙂 Keep up the great work as always 🙂

    • carlosnightman February 23, 2016 / 8:13 am

      Yeah, a very good year for European movies. My favourite Bergman is probably The Magician

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